Top Digital Health Stories of 2018: From Amazon And Google To Gene-Edited Babies

Instead of mind-boggling inventions, 2018 was the year when national governments, as well as healthcare regulators, started to embrace digital health technologies at scale. The year when Google, Amazon, Apple or Microsoft competed head-to-head for the biggest chunks on the healthcare market, and when the buzzword of the year award went to the blockchain. Here’s our guide to the top digital health stories from last year. 2018: Under the spell of cosmos and microcosmos Every year, The Medical Futurist team sits down and collects the top stories of the past 12 months in healthcare. We put the novelties under the microscope, and carefully consider which technologies and/or scientific methods could prove to be a passing fling and which are here to stay for longer. Looking at the scientific field in general and considering a much broader context, it is safe to say that 2018 was both the year of Mars and genetics/genomics: humanity has considerably widened its horizon regarding the infinite space and the microparticle level. In practice, that means, for example, that paleogeneticists discovered that a woman who died 90,000 years ago was parented by two different species of human. According to genome analysis of a bone found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains of Russia, the woman was half Neanderthal, half Denisovan. But not only that finding was made possible by the incredible advancement of genetics and genomics. In March 2018, NASA announced their twin studies program r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers Top Lists 2018 AI artificial intelligence artificial pancreas blockchain chatbot CRISPR deep learning diabetes digital health digital he Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Journal of Advanced ResearchAuthor(s): Sohail Mumtaz, Pradeep Bhartiya, Neha Kaushik, Manish Adhikari, Pradeep Lamichhane, Su-Jae Lee, Nagendra Kumar Kaushik, Eun Ha ChoiAbstractOver the past few decades, microwave (MW) radiation has been widely used, and its biological effects have been extensively investigated. However, the effect of MW radiation on human skin biology is not well understood. We study the effects of pulsed high-power microwaves (HPMs) on melanoma (G361 and SK-Mel-31) and normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. A pulsed power generator (Chundo...
Source: Journal of Advanced Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
We present a series of cases of lungworm infection in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) associated with novel, significant and unusual pulmonary vascular changes. Grey seals (n = 180) that were stranded, in rehabilitation or in long-term captivity in the UK were subjected to post-mortem examination between 2012 and 2018. Lung tissue was collected from 47 individuals for histopathological examination. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on formalin-fixed and paraffin wax-embedded (FFPE) material was attempted for parasite identification on selected sections using lungworm-specific primers, and nematode morphology within...
Source: Journal of Comparative Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
According to a Gallup poll released in 2019, Americans are among the most stressed people in the world. We are connected to our smartphones 24/7, and we seldom take vacations. Can all this stress put you at risk for a stroke? Stress is also personal. Some people can handle high-stress situations, while others may not be able to function under stress. Dr. Andrew J. Ringer, chairman of Mayfield Brain and Spine, says there isn’t an easy answer to that question. “There are no studies that directly…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
We are pleased to invite investors and analysts to participate in a live audio webcast and conference call on Monday, 16 December 2019, highlighting Roche data presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in San Antonio, Texas, from 10th - 14th December.
Source: Roche Investor Update - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Journal of Medicinal Food, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Medicinal Food - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Journal of Medicinal Food, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Medicinal Food - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Journal of Medicinal Food, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Medicinal Food - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Artificial intelligence is already widely entrenched in healthcare industry, so the question should not be, "Will AI happen or not?" said David Houlding, CISSP, CIPP, principal healthcare lead, at Microsoft, in an interview with MD+DI. “It's very much 'What tasks will AI help with, and what will it do and what will it not do?’ ” he continued. “I think we're still learning some of that, but it's largely a proven technology, not just for healthcare providers but for payers, for pharmaceuticals, for life sciencesâ&#...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS Our data demonstrate an oncogenic role of miR-652 in uveal melanoma, showing that miR-652 may be a useful biomarker for prediction of prognosis for patients with uveal melanoma. PMID: 31740654 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Authors: Li YM, Jiang C, He L, Li XX, Hou XX, Chang SS, Lip GYH, Du X, Dong JZ, Ma CS Abstract BACKGROUND There is a growing recognition of sex-related disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, limited data is available in Chinese AF patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We compared symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and treatment of AF according to sex from the China AF Registry study. RESULTS We studied 14 723 patients with non-valvular AF, of whom 5645 patients (38.3%) were female. Women were older than men (67.5±10.6 vs. 62.2±12.2). Compared to men, women had more comorbidities and a higher proport...
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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