Use of Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline in the Treatment of PTSD for Veterans

For deployed veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the estimated costs of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression were between $4.0 billion and $6.2 billion in the first 2 years after they returned home. A number of efficacious treatments for PTSD exist, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapies, although the gap between those who could benefit from evidence-based treatment and those who receive it remains large. Across populations, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as sertraline, have demonstrated moderate effects, while exposure-based therapies, such as prolonged exposure (PE), show large effects. Accordingly, guidelines from the Veterans Administration and Department of Defense recommended sertraline as monotherapy for PTSD treatment among those who cannot or choose not to engage in trauma-focused therapy, such as PE. Given the enhanced effects of psychotherapy combined with medications for the treatment of depression and anxiety, it is intuitive to explore the combination of SSRIs and psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD. However, to our knowledge, the few studies that have examined this question are limited by small sample sizes, and many focus on samples that demonstrate treatment resistance before initiation of both treatment conditions.
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Virtual Reality in Medicine AI apps AR artificial intelligence digital health digital health technologies health apps Innovation mental health psychiatry psychology technology VR Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Clin Hypn Source Type: research
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