Discovery by UCLA researchers could lead to better head and neck cancer therapies

UCLA scientists have discovered that a protein usually linked to rare neurological disorders is also associated with head and neck cancer in people who are infected with the human papilloma virus. And when that protein is combined with another cancer-suppressing protein, it helps improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments, according to a new study by UCLA researchers. Head and neck cancer is the sixth-most common form of cancer worldwide, and represents 5 percent of cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Of the more than 42,000 people diagnosed with head and neck cancer each year, 12,000 will die from the disease. Human papilloma virus is the most common sexually transmitted infection, and HPV diagnoses are at epidemic proportions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that nearly all sexually active men and women will get it at some point in their lives. Led by Dr. Eri Srivatsan and Dr. Marilene Wang, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center members and co-authors of the study, researchers found the link between the protein gigaxonin and head and neck cancer while investigating the chemotherapy drug cisplatin. The drug is successfully able to kill cancer cells by interacting with the protein p16 which is commonly produced in HPV-positive cancers. “We studied the interaction of p16 in the nucleus of the cancer cell after treatment with cisplatin, and observed how the protein interacted with gigaxonin,” said Wang, professor-in-...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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It is currently recognized that in addition to the major impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in females, HPV causes considerable disease in men at the genitals, anal canal, and oropharynx. Specifically, genital HPV infections may progress to genital warts and penile carcinoma. Although studies concerning the natural history of HPV infections and associated neoplasias have mainly focused on women, during the last 2 decades considerable attention has been given in further understanding these infections in men. The HIM (HPV infection in men) Study, the only prospective multicenter study of male HPV natural history,...
Source: Acta Cytologica - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Sexual intercourse is regarded as the primary route of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission. Reported rates of the genotype-specific genital concordance of HPV infection among heterosexual partners vary. Most studies have evaluated only male/female genital transmission, but lately, the oral region has gained interest because of a rising trend of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. Risk factors for type-specific concordance have been reported as an increasing number of younger couples, persistent HPV infection, higher frequency of sexual intercourse, rising number of spouse ’s lifetime sexual partners, and sexual ...
Source: Acta Cytologica - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 21 February 2019Source: Cell, Volume 176, Issue 5Author(s): Shashi Gujar, John Bell, Jean-Simon DialloOncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and kill cancer cells without harming normal cells. OVs can revert cancer-associated immune suppression and initiate clinically meaningful antitumor immune responses. OVs and their resultant immunological events can act at both primary and metastatic sites. Thus, OVs can be exploited for cancer gene therapies and immunotherapies alone or in combination with other interventions, including immune checkpoint blockade.
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 21 February 2019Source: Cell, Volume 176, Issue 5Author(s): Ting Fu, Sally Coulter, Eiji Yoshihara, Tae Gyu Oh, Sungsoon Fang, Fritz Cayabyab, Qiyun Zhu, Tong Zhang, Mathias Leblanc, Sihao Liu, Mingxiao He, Wanda Waizenegger, Emanuel Gasser, Bernd Schnabl, Annette R. Atkins, Ruth T. Yu, Rob Knight, Christopher Liddle, Michael Downes, Ronald M. EvansSummaryIncreased levels of intestinal bile acids (BAs) are a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we show that the convergence of dietary factors (high-fat diet) and dysregulated WNT signaling (APC mutation) alters BA profiles to drive malignant trans...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Journal Name: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
CANCER symptoms vary depending on which part of the body is affected by a tumour. You could be at risk of deadly tumour signs if you notice this feeling in your teeth. It could be a warning sign of deadly mouth cancer. Should you see a doctor?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article aims to address the challenges and management options in women who have a field effect of HPV-associated disease.
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
This article aims to address the challenges and management options in women who have a field effect of HPV associated disease.
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity ID: 287592 Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-GH15-15370201SUPP16 Opportunity Title: Program Expansion Supplement: Technical Assistance to Provide High-Quality Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision (VMMC) Services to Programs Supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryOpportunity Category Explanation: Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCategory Explanation: CFDA Number(s): 93.067Eligible Applicants: Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)A...
Source: Grants.gov - Category: Research Tags: Health Source Type: funding
Anogenital preinvasive and invasive lesions are known to have been on the increase in the industrialised world since the 1970s.1 The increase in anal squamous cell carcinomas and Kaposi's sarcomas (KS) has often been associated with the HIV epidemic, especially among men having sex with men. KS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are virus-related (KS-associated herpes virus and Epstein–Barr, respectively) AIDS-defining illnesses.2 Among anogenital cancers, only cervical cancer is listed as AIDS-defining illness. A large proportion of anogenital preinvasive and invasive lesions are human papillomavirus (HPV)-related, with a v...
Source: Sexually Transmitted Infections - Category: Sexual Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
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