Doctors' Office Dementia Tests Are Often Wrong: Study

Title: Doctors' Office Dementia Tests Are Often Wrong: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/28/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/29/2018 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

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DEMENTIA is a term used to describe conditions affecting the brain, such as Alzheimer ’s disease. Currently there’s no cure, but research has suggested ways it can be prevented. One way to prevent dementia could be to keep reading.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of the ReviewWith no disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) currently established, a priority for public health is prevention of cognitive decline and dementia. Treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) may provide such an opportunity.Recent FindingsWhile the pathology of athero- and arteriolosclerotic cerebrovascular disease was once thought of as distinct from AD pathobiology, accumulating evidence suggests that there is more overlap in vascular and AD-related pathologies than previously recognized. CVD and its risk factors are associated with cognitive decline and...
Source: Current Geriatrics Reports - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The barrier between mind and body appears to be crumbling. Clinical practice and public perception need to catch upUnlikely as it may seem, #inflammation has become a hashtag. It seems to be everywhere suddenly, up to all sorts of tricks. Rather than simply being on our side, fighting infections and healing wounds, it turns out to have a dark side as well: the role it plays in causing us harm.It ’s now clear that inflammation is part of the problem in many, if not all, diseases of the body. And targeting immune or inflammatory causes of disease has led to a series of breakthroughs, from new treatments for rheumatoid ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychiatry Multiple sclerosis Depression Dementia Society Medical research Science UK news Alzheimer's Parkinson's disease Schizophrenia Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Frank Jessen, Rebecca E Amariglio, Rachel F Buckley, Wiesje M van der Flier, Ying Han, José Luis Molinuevo, Laura Rabin, Dorene M Rentz, Octavio Rodriguez-Gomez, Andrew J Saykin, Sietske A M Sikkes, Colette M Smart, Steffen Wolfsgruber, Michael WagnerSummaryA growing awareness about brain health and Alzheimer's disease in the general population is leading to an increasing number of cognitively unimpaired individuals, who are concerned that they have reduced cognitive function, to approach the medical system for help. The term su...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
DEMENTIA is a progressive neurological condition that mainly affects people over the of 65, although it is not a natural part of ageing. Spotting the early warning signs is key to maintaining quality of life for as long as possible. A recent study suggests that Alzheimer ’s disease, the most common form of dementia, can be signalled by a change in your eyes.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Herring WJ, Ceesay P, Snyder E, Bliwise D, Budd K, Hutzelmann J, Stevens J, Lines C, Michelson D Abstract INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the clinical profile of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant for treating insomnia in patients with mild-to-moderate probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, 4-week trial of suvorexant 10 mg (could be increased to 20 mg based on clinical response) or placebo in patients who met clinical diagnostic criteria for both probable AD dementia and insomnia. Sleep was assessed by overnight polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. The primar...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
The IPDGC (The International Parkinson Disease Genomics Consortium) and EADB (Alzheimer Disease European DNA biobank) are listed correctly as an author to the article, however, they were incorrectly listed more than once.
Source: Acta Neuropathologica - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: ¹⁸F-FC119S PET provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting AD and therefore may be considered a useful diagnostic tool for AD. PMID: 31942769 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
Purpose of review The incidence of Alzheimer's disease is increasing. Premortem diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is now possible but require invasive and expensive testing such as PET amyloid beta binding and/or spinal fluid amyloid beta levels. There is a great need for minimally invasive and inexpensive biomarkers to allow for early diagnosis and intervention. Recent findings There has been a large volume of literature assessing ocular biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. Much of the research to date has significant limitations, including sample size, variable diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease, lack of biom...
Source: Current Opinion in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: NEURO-OPHTHALMOLOGY: Edited by Heather E. Moss Source Type: research
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