Measles Cases Spiked Worldwide Last Year Due to ‘Gaps in Vaccination Coverage’: New Report

Reported cases of measles spiked in 2017, threatening years of public health progress and pointing to gaps in vaccination coverage worldwide, according to new data released Thursday from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Between 2000 and 2017, reported measles incidence dropped by 83%, saving about 21 million lives and resulting in an 80% decline in measles mortality, the new data shows. But toward the end of that time period, researchers observed a worrisome trend: between 2016 and 2017, reported measles cases increased by 31% globally. Increases were observed in nearly every disease-monitoring region, with the largest spikes seen among nations in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean. Only the Western Pacific region saw a decline. Reported #measles cases spike globally in 2017 due to gaps in vaccination coverage 📈📈📈: New report https://t.co/xSGE3cbKhW pic.twitter.com/PXXS4ZXixU — World Health Organization (WHO) (@WHO) November 29, 2018 Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that can cause a telltale rash, high fever and cough; in serious cases, it can result in brain swelling, pneumonia, vision loss or death. The virus can be prevented with a two-dose vaccination. The fact that measles cases are surging even in countries that had largely eliminated the disease suggests that reluctance to getting the vaccine may be to blame, according to health officials. “Gaps in vacc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Related Links:

A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No measles case...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news
A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to at least a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No mea...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news
A measles outbreak is spreading within New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community, with 21 cases coming from a single yeshiva in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, according to city health officials. The New York City Department of Health announced Thursday that 121 people have contracted measles since the outbreak began in October, and 31 cases have been newly identified. The vast majority of cases have affected children, particularly in the Borough Park and Williamsburg neighborhoods of Brooklyn. The outbreak’s initial case was acquired when a person visited Israel, where a measles outbreak is in progress, according to h...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
We describe the case of a 44 year-old Portuguese woman who presented with fever, conjunctivitis, cough and rash, rapidly evolving to hepatitis and extensive pneumonia with respiratory failure. Although she claimed to be vaccinated according to the national immunisation schedule, a final diagnosis of primary measles pneumonia was clinically made and confirmed by serology. However, some less typical features mislead us initially. Although the rare form of primary measles pneumonia is more prevalent among immunosuppressed patients, our patient was immunocompetent. Moreover, absence of contagiousness, ...
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
[MSF] Being vaccinated against diseases like diphtheria, measles, whooping cough, meningitis, pneumonia, yellow fever, and other potentially fatal illnesses is a commonplace event for many children. But in northern Mali, where a combination of insecurity, isolation, and limited health infrastructure means that many communities cannot access health facilities, it can prove difficult to protect children against these illnesses.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
More News: Brain | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Children | Cough | Eyes | Health | International Medicine & Public Health | Italy Health | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Neurology | Pneomococcal Vaccine | Pneumonia | Vaccines | WHO