Glycoproteomic markers of hepatocellular carcinoma-mass spectrometry based approaches.

We describe the development and results of mass spectrometry-based assays for glycan screening based on either MALDI-MS or ESI analysis. These analyses might be based on the glycan content of serum or on glycan screening for target molecules from serum. We describe some of the specific markers that have been developed as a result, including for proteins such as Haptoglobin, Hemopexin, Kininogen, and others. We discuss the potential role for other technologies, including PGC chromatography and ion mobility, to separate isoforms of glycan markers. Analyses of glycopeptides based on new technologies and innovative softwares are described and also their potential role in discovery of markers of HCC. These technologies include new fragmentation methods such as EThcD and stepped HCD, which can identify large numbers of glycopeptide structures from serum. The key role of lectin extraction in various assays for intact glycopeptides or their truncated versions is also described, where various core-fucosylated and hyperfucosylated glycopeptides have been identified as potential markers of HCC. Finally, we describe the role of LC-MRMs or lectin-FLISA MRMs as a means to validate these glycoprotein markers from patient samples. These technological advancements in mass spectrometry have the potential to lead to novel biomarkers to improve the early detection of HCC. PMID: 30472795 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Mass Spectrometry Reviews - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Mass Spectrom Rev Source Type: research

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Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ali Mahzari1, Songpei Li1, Xiu Zhou1,2, Dongli Li2, Sherouk Fouda1, Majid Alhomrani1, Wala Alzahrani1, Stephen R. Robinson1 and Ji-Ming Ye1,2* 1Lipid Biology and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China The present study investigated the effects of matrine on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet and the mechanism involved. The study was performed in C57B/6J mice fed a MCD diet for 6 weeks to induce NAS...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes up 75%-85% of all primary liver cancers and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Chronic liver disease is the most significant risk factor for HCC with 80%-90% of new cases occurring in the background of cirrhosis. Studies have shown that early diagnosis of HCC through surveillance programs improve prognosis and availability of curative therapies. All patients with cirrhosis and high-risk hepatitis B patients are at risk for HCC and should undergo surveillance. The recommended surveillance modality is abdominal ultrasound (US) given that i...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary hepatic malignancies. With the exception of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), other etiologies of chronic liver disease require progression to cirrhosis before HCC development. Case reports have described HCC in noncirrhotic patients with hepatitis C (HCV) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Goal: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of patients without cirrhosis and CHB who developed HCC among a large cohort of HCC patients and to identify independent variables that are associated with no cirrhosis among patients with HCC. Study: Fr...
Source: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: LIVER, PANCREAS & BILIARY TRACT: Original Articles Source Type: research
Authors: Desai A, Sandhu S, Lai JP, Sandhu DS Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer, which in turns accounts for the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite being the 6th most common cancer it is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths. HCC typically arises in the background of cirrhosis, however, about 20% of cases can develop in a non-cirrhotic liver. This particular subgroup of HCC generally presents at an advanced stage as surveillance is not performed in a non-cirrhotic liver. HCC in non-cirrhotic patients is clinically silent in its early stages ...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
This report reviews the hepatoprotective effects of curcumin with a focus on its mechanistic insights in various hepatotoxic protocols. PMID: 30529260 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Food and Chemical Toxicology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Chem Toxicol Source Type: research
Conclusion: The major HCV genotype observed was 3 which is difficult to treat with direct-acting antivirals, owing to the more rapid progression of liver disease, increased rates of steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), a higher risk for cancer (HCC). We believe this study is the first one to address the prevalence of mixed genotypes and untypeable genotype from India.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: There is predominance of male patients with a mean age of 58.3 years. Degree ≤ II is the most frequent to the Edmondson-Steiner histological classification in the evaluated casuistic. HCV, ALD and NAFLD is the most common etiological agents found in the study. The (high) underestimated prevalence of NAFLD in the pre-transplanted patients is due to the fact that all patients presented cirrhosis, masking NAFLD signals. PMID: 30360608 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most frequent cause of cancer death worldwide, particularly in Asia and Africa. Most cases complicate an underlying liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis B or C chronic virus infection or alcoholic abuse. But, following the current epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes, it appears that these diseases, associated in metabolic syndrome, are responsible for non alcoholic fatty liver disease at risk of HCC frequently before the stage of cirrhosis. Recent hypotheses consider that in the near future, cancer deaths due to HCC will overpass in USA those due to breast or colorec...
Source: Bulletin du Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Bull Cancer Source Type: research
Testa Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The major forms of primary liver cancer are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). Both these tumors develop against a background of cirrhotic liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic liver damage and fibrosis. HCC is a heterogeneous disease which usually develops within liver cirrhosis related to various etiologies: hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (frequent in Asia and Africa), hepatitis C virus (HCV), chronic alcohol abuse, or metabolic syndrome (frequent in Western countries). In cirrhosis, hepa...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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