Could FRUIT help heart attack patients?

A team of doctors and biologists at Cambridge University believe injecting a chemical found in strawberries and apples could reduce the damage to the heart in the aftermath of an attack.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

CONCLUSIONS: Despite modern advances in screening, management, and interventional measures for CVD, rising trends in CVD risk factors across all sex and race/ethnic groups call for attention by preventive cardiologists. PMID: 32483642 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Southern Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: South Med J Source Type: research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), seems to have a cardiovascular tropism characterized by high incidence of myocardial infarction especially for patients with severe infections recovered in intensive care units. In their letter, the Authors state that oxidative stress could play a pivotal role to determine cardiovascular complications in COVID-19. We agree about this issue. In particular, NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX-2), that it is considered one of the most important sources of superoxide anion in human [1], plays a role in systemic inflammation and pathogenesis of several RNA virus as the influenza virus [2].
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
We have read an experimental study entitled “miR-135b protects cardiomyocytes from infarction through restraining the NLRP3/caspase-1/IL-1β pathway” written by Li and his colleagues [1]. They demonstrated that miR-135b overexpression remarkably restored impaired cardiac function caused by myocardial infarction(MI)via restraining pyroptos is pathway.
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Recently, we have read with great interest Dr. Zhao and colleagues' article entitled “Circulating Serpina3 levels predict the major adverse cardiac events in patients with myocardial infarction” [1] that published in International Journal of Cardiology. In this article, they draw a conclusion that the concentrations of serpina3 prospectively predict the development of major adve rse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Conclusions. LDL-C is the lipid fraction strongest associated with younger age of presentation of first MI. These results support the importance of controlling and treating LDL-C in prevention of premature MI. PMID: 32483990 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Scand Cardiovasc J Source Type: research
ConclusionRobotically assisted Heller myotomy and POEM are safe and efficacious treatments for achalasia with lower rates of technical complications compared to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. With the advancements in endoscopic instruments and robotic surgery, POEM and robotically assisted Heller myotomy should be considered in the treatment of achalasia and esophageal dysmotility disorders.
Source: Surgical Endoscopy - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsFor paracetamol versus ibuprofen, when using LSPS methods in the CPRD, it is only possible to distinguish true effects if those effects are large (hazard ratio  >  2). Due to their smaller hazard ratios, the outcomes under study cannot be differentiated from null effects (represented by negative controls) even if there were a true effect. Based on these data, we conclude that we are unable to determine whether paracetamol is associated with an increased ris k of myocardial infarction, stroke, GI bleeding, and acute renal failure compared to ibuprofen, due to residual confounding.
Source: Drug Safety - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
(CNN) — Still taking a daily aspirin to ward off heart attacks? You might want to think again, according to a new review. Aspirin is still one of the most commonly used medications in the world, even though it’s no longer recommended as a preventative by many health authorities. There is no evidence that low-dose aspirin — less than 325 milligrams a day — should be taken by most adults in good cardiovascular health, according to a new review of existing research that published Wednesday in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. The review, which focused on the risks and benefits of low-dose d...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News aspirin CNN Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS Sevoflurane exerts a delayed cardioprotective effects against myocardial injury in rats by activation of AMPK and restoration of I/R-impaired autophagic flux. PMID: 32476662 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
More News: Apples | Biology | Cambridge University | Cardiology | Chemistry | Health | Heart | Heart Attack | Strawberries