Identification of pulmonary treatable traits in a real-life setting

Identification of treatable traits is proposed as a precision medicine approach for asthma and COPD. We sought to characterise the pulmonary treatable traits in patients attending the Oxford Centre for Respiratory Medicine (2014-2017).Adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD were recruited (n=214). Clinical demographics, medication use and medical history was recorded. Whole blood, induced sputum, and spirometry with reversibility and disease specific symptoms were assessed. Qualitative CT reports were recorded within 2 years of the study visit.The cohort were older adults (mean age 55 years, 53% female) who were prescribed a high dose of inhaled corticosteroids (1000 micrograms). Pulmonary traits identified and their frequency is shown below. Pulmonary TraitNumber (%)No. AssessedEosinophilic inflammation111 (60)186Airflow limitation99 (53)187Bacterial colonisation73 (50)146Smooth muscle contraction49 (85)58Loss elastic recoil33 (30)112Airway mucosal oedema32 (29)112Chronic bronchitis20 (10)204Bronchiectasis3 (3)112The most commonly assessed trait was chronic bronchitis. The commonest treatable trait identified was eosinophilic inflammation (defined as a sputum eosinophil proportion>3% and/or a blood eosinophil number>300 and/or FeNO>50ppb). Airflow limitation was more common in COPD (87% vs. 45%, p
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Problems Source Type: research

Related Links:

by Kueiyu Joshua Lin, Evan Dvorin, Aaron S. Kesselheim BackgroundEvidence and guidelines do not support use of systemic steroids for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs), but such practice appears common. We aim to quantify such use and determine its predictors. Methods and findingsWe conducted a cohort study based on a large United States national commercial claims database, the IBM MarketScan, to identify patients aged 18 –64 years with an ARTI diagnosis (acute bronchitis, sinusitis, pharyngitis, otitis media, allergic rhinitis, influenza, pneumonia, and unspecified upper respiratory infections) recorded in a...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractThe mucolytic monoterpene 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol), the major constituent of eucalyptus species, is well known for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, bronchodilatory, antiviral and antimicrobial effects. The main protective antiviral, anti-inflammatory and mucolytic mechanisms of 1,8-cineole are the induction of interferon regulatory factor  3 (IRF3), the control of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) along with decreasing mucin genes (MUC2, MUC19). In normal human monocytes direct inhibition was shown of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mucus hypersecretion...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
PDE4 inhibitors can suppress a variety of inflammatory cell functions that contribute to their anti-inflammatory actions in respiratory diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The systemically delivered PDE4 inhibitor roflumilast has been approved for use in a subset of patients with severe COPD with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. Use of systemically delivered PDE4 inhibitors has been limited by systemic side effects. Inhaled PDE4 inhibitors have been considered as a viable alternative to increase tolerability and determine the maximum therapeutic potential of PDE4 inhibit...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Influenza vaccination is the most effective way to prevent influenza. Few studies on its rate were reported throughout China and for populations with chronic diseases. An estimation of the rates in China was accomplished. METHODS: All data were from a national cross-sectional survey of a sample representing the population aged 40 years or older in mainland China in 2014-15. A total of 74,484 individuals with complete self-reported influenza vaccination status were analyzed in 2018-19. RESULTS: The overall influenza vaccination rate was 2.4% (95% CI 1.4-3.3) with 1.7% (95% CI 1...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
What is a coronavirus? Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that cause diseases in mammals, including humans, and birds. Why are they called coronaviruses? The name derives from the fact that the viral capsule has a “halo” or “crown” surrounding it. What do coronaviruses do? In humans, the virus infects the airways giving rise to flu-like symptoms, a runny nose, cough, sore throat and fever, these are usually mild, but in rare cases can be lethal. Is there a vaccine against coronaviruses? No. Are there any drugs to block or treat infection? No. When were coronaviruses first discovered? In the 1960s ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsUse of e-cigarettes is an independent risk factor for respiratory disease in addition to combustible tobacco smoking. Dual use, the most common use pattern, is riskier than using either product alone.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Vaping or using e-cigarettes for a long period of time may be associated with an increased risk of respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD, chronic bronchitis and asthma, according to a new study.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(CNN) — Vaping or using e-cigarettes for a long period of time was associated with an increased risk of respiratory diseases — including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD, chronic bronchitis and asthma — in a new study. The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine on Monday, is among the first bodies of research to examine the link between e-cigarette use and respiratory disease in the long-term, by analyzing e-cigarette use and respiratory disease during a three-year period. “I was a little surprised that we could find evidence on incident lung disease in the long...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Vaping Source Type: news
This study actually does support the harm reduction potential of e-cigarettes,” says Andy Tan, an assistant professor of population sciences at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute who has studied e-cigarettes. “Yes, vaping is associated with about 29% to 31% higher odds of subsequent lung disease within two to three years than not vaping—but compare this with the 156% higher odds of using combustible tobacco than not smoking.” For the purposes of the study, Glantz and his co-author combined four conditions—chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma—in...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized E-Cigarettes embargoed study Lung Disease Research vaping Source Type: news
MONDAY, Dec. 16, 2019 -- As if the news on vaping wasn't bad enough, a new study suggests that e-cigarette users are also at significantly higher risk of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and COPD. Those risks rose even...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
More News: Asthma | Bronchitis | Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary | Corticosteroid Therapy | Respiratory Medicine | Spirometry | Study