Dementia Linked to Death in Most Older Adults with Down Syndrome

(MedPage Today) -- Late-onset epilepsy, APOE status raised mortality risk substantially
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

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In the Editorial titled “Prevalence and Severity of Alzheimer Disease in Individuals With Down Syndrome,” published online November 19, 2018, a typographical error was corrected in the sentence in the third paragraph that includes the phrase “late-onset epilepsy increased mortality risk in individuals with DS and dem entia by 10-fold.” The phrase “in individuals with DS and dementia” was changed to “in individuals with DS without dementia.”
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study investigates the prevalence of dementia and aging-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, epilepsy, anemia, and weight loss, in older adult individuals with Down syndrome.
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe previously reported high risk levels for dementia among people with Down syndrome were confirmed in this data as was the relationship with late onset epilepsy. The value of the instruments utilised in tracking decline and helping to confirm diagnosis is further highlighted.
Source: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research - Category: Disability Authors: Tags: Original Manuscript Source Type: research
Discussion New-onset epilepsy seems to occur early in the course of dementia in DS patients. Patients generally respond to treatment. A great burden of neuropsychiatric symptoms is seen. Future studies need to explore the relationship between β-amyloid accumulation and epileptiform activity and attend to the care and needs of DS patients with dementia and seizures.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Purpose of review: Alzheimer's disease is most likely universal in older individuals with Down syndrome, due to having three copies of the amyloid precursor protein gene, resulting in amyloid-beta plaque deposition. Down syndrome is an important population in which to consider clinical trials of treatments to prevent or delay the development of dementia. However, assessment of subtler cognitive changes is challenging due to the presence of intellectual disability. Recent findings: Recent research confirmed that older adults with Down syndrome often present with cognitive decline: more than 80% may experience dementia by a...
Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS: Edited by James C. Harris Source Type: research
DISCUSSION: New-onset epilepsy seems to occur early in the course of dementia in DS patients. Patients generally respond to treatment. A great burden of neuropsychiatric symptoms is seen. Future studies need to explore the relationship between β-amyloid accumulation and epileptiform activity and attend to the care and needs of DS patients with dementia and seizures. PMID: 28109983 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Alzheimer's disease is most likely universal in older individuals with Down syndrome, due to having three copies of the amyloid precursor protein gene, resulting in amyloid-beta plaque deposition. Down syndrome is an important population in which to consider clinical trials of treatments to prevent or delay the development of dementia. However, assessment of subtler cognitive changes is challenging due to the presence of intellectual disability. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research confirmed that older adults with Down syndrome often present with cognitive decline: more than 80% may ex...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Psychiatry Source Type: research
AimThe aim of this study was to describe the incidence of morbidities and the prevalence of medical prescriptions in a large Down syndrome population. MethodA retrospective cohort study was carried out using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2013. We matched individuals with Down syndrome to randomly selected control participants by practice site, sex, birth year, and recording period. ResultsA total of 6430 individuals with Down syndrome (3009 females, 3421 males) and 19 176 controls (8966 females, 10 210 males) were included in the study. The incidence of cardiovascul...
Source: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere is significant medical morbidity in Down syndrome. This morbidity contributes to the lower life expectancy. Respiratory failure is a risk factor for mortality in Down syndrome. We need to thoroughly investigate people with Down syndrome to ensure any treatable illnesses are well managed.
Source: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research - Category: Disability Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: New onset epilepsy seems to occur early in the course of dementia in DS patients. It is unclear if epilepsy has a role in dementia progression. Treatment response was generally good except for epileptic myoclonus. Future studies are needed to study patients with DS and dementia, with and without epilepsy and investigate the interplay between Alzheimer’s dementia pathology.Disclosure: Dr. Gholipour has nothing to disclose. Dr. Sarkis has nothing to disclose. Dr. El-Chemali has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG): Clinical Epilepsy Source Type: research
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