Full genome characterization of two novel Alpha-coronavirus species from Italian bats.

In this study, three strains of Alpha-CoV genera detected in Italian bats (Pipistrellus kuhlii) were fully sequenced by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and characterized. The complete genome analysis showed the correlation of the Italians strains with a Chinese strain detected in 2013 and, based on CoV molecular species demarcation, two new Alpha-CoV species were established. The analysis of a fragment of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) showed the correlation of the Italian strains with CoVs was only detected in the bat Pipistrellus genera (Pipistrellus kuhlii and Pipistrellus Pipistrellus) in European countries. PMID: 30447246 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Virus Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Virus Res Source Type: research

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Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Virus Research, Volume 105Author(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbreaks in humans w...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 August 2019Source: Advances in Virus ResearchAuthor(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbre...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Human coronavirus (HCoV) infection causes respiratory diseases with mild to severe outcomes. In the last 15 years, we have witnessed the emergence of two zoonotic, highly pathogenic HCoVs: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Replication of HCoV is regulated by a diversity of host factors and induces drastic alterations in cellular structure and physiology. Activation of critical signaling pathways during HCoV infection modulates the induction of antiviral immune response and contributes to the pathogenesis of HCoV. Recent st...
Source: Annual Review of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Microbiol Source Type: research
In conclusion, we firstly carried out whole genome characterization of the SARS-like bat coronavirus discovered in the Republic of Korea; however, it presumably has no human infectivity. However, continuous surveillance and genomic characterization of coronaviru ses from bats are necessary due to potential risks of human infection induced by genetic mutation.
Source: Virus Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
ng Zhou During the past two decades, three zoonotic coronaviruses have been identified as the cause of large-scale disease outbreaks–Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Swine Acute Diarrhea Syndrome (SADS). SARS and MERS emerged in 2003 and 2012, respectively, and caused a worldwide pandemic that claimed thousands of human lives, while SADS struck the swine industry in 2017. They have common characteristics, such as they are all highly pathogenic to humans or livestock, their agents originated from bats, and two of them originated in China. Thus, it is highly...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2019Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 34Author(s): Lin-Fa Wang, Danielle E AndersonIn the last two decades, several high impact zoonotic disease outbreaks have been linked to bat-borne viruses. These include SARS coronavirus, Hendra virus and Nipah virus. In addition, it has been suspected that ebolaviruses and MERS coronavirus are also linked to bats. It is being increasingly accepted that bats are potential reservoirs of a large number of known and unknown viruses, many of which could spillover into animal and human populations. However, our knowledge into basic bat biology and immuno...
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
lin Han Chuan Qin Coronaviruses (CoVs) have formerly been regarded as relatively harmless respiratory pathogens to humans. However, two outbreaks of severe respiratory tract infection, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), as a result of zoonotic CoVs crossing the species barrier, caused high pathogenicity and mortality rates in human populations. This brought CoVs global attention and highlighted the importance of controlling infectious pathogens at international borders. In this review, we focus on our current understa...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, Volume 25, Issue 7Author(s): Uzma FaridiAbstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome is the acute respiratory syndrome caused by betacoronavirus MERS-CoV. The first case of this disease was reported from Saudi Arabia in 2012. This virus is lethal and is a close relative of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), which is responsible for more than 3000 deaths in 2002–2003. According to Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. The number of new cases is 457 in 2015. Riyadh has the highest number of reports in comparison to the other cities. According...
Source: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Young Go The Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV), first identified in Saudi Arabia, is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe acute respiratory illness in humans with a high fatality rate. Since its emergence, MERS-CoV continues to spread to countries outside of the Arabian Peninsula and gives rise to sporadic human infections following the entry of infected individuals to other countries, which can precipitate outbreaks similar to the one that occurred in South Korea in 2015. Current therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection have primarily been adapted from previous drugs used for the trea...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 December 2017 Source:Antiviral Research Author(s): Renqiang Liu, Jinliang Wang, Yu Shao, Xijun Wang, Huilei Zhang, Lei Shuai, Jinying Ge, Zhiyuan Wen, Zhigao Bu Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been a highly threatening zoonotic pathogen since its outbreak in 2012. Similar to SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV belongs to the coronavirus family and can induce severe respiratory symptoms in humans, with an average case fatality rate of 35% according to the World Health Organization. Spike (S) protein of MERS-CoV is immunogenic and can induce neutralizing antibodies, thus is a...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
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