Can social marketing make 20mph the new norm?

Publication date: September 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 3 Author(s): Sarah Toy , Alan Tapp , Charles Musselwhite , Adrian Davis This paper reports the findings of a study that explored the possible role for social marketing in supporting compliance with 20mph signs-only speed limits. The study, completed in July 2012, involved a review of the literature, the re-visiting of case studies of existing and planned 20mph signs-only schemes, mainly within Great Britain, and a qualitative research project with the citizens of Bristol, England. A key finding was the mismatch between people׳s apparent support for 20mph limits and their actual driving behaviour. The qualitative research focused on investigating this gap. A range of groups of Bristol drivers and residents were recruited for the research to provide insights into why some people may not comply with 20mph limits where they are in place, and what could be done to counter this non-compliance. The findings suggest three possible driver types in relation to 20mph areas: ‘champions’, ‘pragmatists’ and ‘opponents’. The paper discusses the possible mapping of these types onto Moore׳s ‘crossing the chasm’ variant of Rogers׳ diffusion of an innovation model. Here, the ‘chasm’ represents the difficulty in encouraging compliance amongst pragmatists in the same way as champions. Based on this, it is suggested that social marketing techni...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

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