DNA methylation of FKBP5 and response to exposure ‐based psychological therapy

Differential DNA methylation of the hypothalamic ‐pituitary‐adrenal axis related geneFKBP5 has recently been shown to be associated with varying response to environmental influences and may play a role in how well people respond to psychological treatments. Participants (n = 111) received exposure‐based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for agoraphobia with or without panic disorder, or specific phobias. Percentage DNA methylation levels were measured for the promoter region and intron 7 ofFKBP5. The association between percentage reduction in clinical severity and change in DNA methylation was tested using linear mixed models. The effect of genotype (rs1360780) was tested by the inclusion of an interaction term. The association between change in DNA methylation andFKBP5 expression was examined. Change in percentage DNA methylation at one CpG site of intron 7 was associated with percentage reduction in severity ( β = −4.26,p = 3.90 × 10−4), where a decrease in DNA methylation was associated with greater response to therapy. An interaction was detected between rs1360780 and changes in DNA methylation in the promoter region ofFKBP5 on treatment outcome (p = .045) but did not survive correction for multiple testing. Changes in DNA methylation were not associated withFKBP5 expression. Decreasing DNA methylation at one CpG site of intron 7 ofFKBP5 was strongly associated with decreasing anxiety ...
Source: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Similar to the past SCID versions, kappa values were found to be quite high and all were statistically significant. The Turkish version of SCID-5/ CV can be reliably used in both clinical practice and clinical studies. PMID: 31170307 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Turkish Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Turk Psikiyatri Derg Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There is still a need for more research into VR exposure therapy, especially in complex anxiety disorders (e. g. panic disorder, agoraphobia and social anxiety disorder) and trauma-related disorders. Furthermore, VR has become established as a research tool. The rapid technological development gives reason to expect a continuing increase in VR research, in clinical as well as basic research. PMID: 30715554 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Nervenarzt - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 December 2018Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): C.M Vicario, M.A Salehinejad, K. Felmingham, G. Martino, M A NitscheAbstractThe interest in the use of non-invasive brain stimulation for enhancing neural functions and reducing symptoms in anxiety disorders is growing. Based on the DSM-V classification for anxiety disorders, we examined all available research using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for the treatment of specific phobias, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and gen...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
For something so common, anxiety is still massively misunderstood. There are myths and misconceptions about everything from what anxiety disorders look and feel like to what actually helps to treat these illnesses and navigate anxiety. Which is why we asked several anxiety experts to clear things up. Below, you’ll find their illuminating insights. Living with an anxiety disorder can be exceptionally difficult. Many people minimize and trivialize anxiety disorders. For instance, how often have you said or heard someone say “I’m sooo OCD about my desk!” or “I’m really OCD about using hand ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorder Treatment Anxiety Disorders Cbt exposure and response prevention therapy GAD Ocd Source Type: news
A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 10 August 2018Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Emily Carl, Aliza T. Stein, Andrew Levihn-Coon, Jamie R. Pogue, Barbara Rothbaum, Paul Emmelkamp, Gordon J.G. Asmundson, Per Carlbring, Mark B. PowersAbstractTrials of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) for anxiety-related disorders have proliferated in number and diversity since a previous meta-analysis that examined 13 total trials, most of which were for specific phobias (Powers &Emmelkamp, 2008). Since then, new trials have compared VRET to more diverse anxiety and related disorders including social anxiety disorder...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This article reviews this relationship and provides recommendations for management. Keywords: Insomnia, sleep disorder, psychiatric disorder, depression, psychosis, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder Insomnia affects 25 million people in the United States annually and leads to an estimated $100 billion health care burden. Insomnia has also been shown to be a causal factor in other medical and psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairments, accidents, absenteeism, and reduced quality of life.1 The cost of not treating insomnia is more than the cost of treating insomnia.2 Insomnia as a symptom is seen in up to one third of the Un...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review anxiety disorder depression insomnia psychiatric disorder psychosis schizophrenia sleep disorder Source Type: research
Conclusion. The audio-digital recording method provides a useful second opinion that can affirm the need for a different treatment intervention in these anxious patients. A second live assessment would have required additional clinic time and added patient burden. The audio-digital recording method is less burdensome than live second opinion assessments and might have utility in both research and clinical practice settings. Keywords: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), anxiolytic medications, anxious symptoms, audio-digital recording, dual review, second opinions Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in most populations wher...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Original Research anxiolytic medications anxious symptoms audio-digital recording dual review Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) second opinions Source Type: research
h T Abstract According to the Federal Healthcare Survey (Bundesgesundheitssurvey), approximately 15% of the German population fulfil the diagnostic criteria for at least one anxiety disorder within (any) 1 year. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The study by the Robert Koch Institute included the systematic assessment of panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias; therefore, the question for both those affected and the treating therapist is "anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?" is of great clinical and healthc...
Source: Der Nervenarzt - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research
If 2.6 billion people were suffering from an illness, you’d think we’d all be more familiar with it. That figure represents 33.7% of the population of the world, after all. It also represents the share of that population that will at some point experience an anxiety disorder, according to the National Institutes of Health. For those billions, the experience of clinical anxiety can range from a persistent fretfulness, distractedness and a sort of whole-body clenching, to the paralytic crisis of a full-blown panic attack. All of it feels lousy; all of it is a state you race to escape — which typically only ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized anxiety disorder behavior health OCD psychology PTSD Source Type: news
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