Hepatitis C virus infection in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India: Identification of a mixed and novel genotype

Conclusion: The major HCV genotype observed was 3 which is difficult to treat with direct-acting antivirals, owing to the more rapid progression of liver disease, increased rates of steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), a higher risk for cancer (HCC). We believe this study is the first one to address the prevalence of mixed genotypes and untypeable genotype from India.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research

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Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary hepatic malignancies. With the exception of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), other etiologies of chronic liver disease require progression to cirrhosis before HCC development. Case reports have described HCC in noncirrhotic patients with hepatitis C (HCV) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Goal: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of patients without cirrhosis and CHB who developed HCC among a large cohort of HCC patients and to identify independent variables that are associated with no cirrhosis among patients with HCC. Study: Fr...
Source: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: LIVER, PANCREAS & BILIARY TRACT: Original Articles Source Type: research
Authors: Desai A, Sandhu S, Lai JP, Sandhu DS Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer, which in turns accounts for the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite being the 6th most common cancer it is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths. HCC typically arises in the background of cirrhosis, however, about 20% of cases can develop in a non-cirrhotic liver. This particular subgroup of HCC generally presents at an advanced stage as surveillance is not performed in a non-cirrhotic liver. HCC in non-cirrhotic patients is clinically silent in its early stages ...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
This report reviews the hepatoprotective effects of curcumin with a focus on its mechanistic insights in various hepatotoxic protocols. PMID: 30529260 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Food and Chemical Toxicology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Chem Toxicol Source Type: research
Conclusions: There is predominance of male patients with a mean age of 58.3 years. Degree ≤ II is the most frequent to the Edmondson-Steiner histological classification in the evaluated casuistic. HCV, ALD and NAFLD is the most common etiological agents found in the study. The (high) underestimated prevalence of NAFLD in the pre-transplanted patients is due to the fact that all patients presented cirrhosis, masking NAFLD signals. PMID: 30360608 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
Testa Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The major forms of primary liver cancer are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). Both these tumors develop against a background of cirrhotic liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic liver damage and fibrosis. HCC is a heterogeneous disease which usually develops within liver cirrhosis related to various etiologies: hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (frequent in Asia and Africa), hepatitis C virus (HCV), chronic alcohol abuse, or metabolic syndrome (frequent in Western countries). In cirrhosis, hepa...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Authors: Ghouri YA, Mian I, Rowe JH Abstract Since the 1970s, the epidemic of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has spread beyond the Eastern Asian predominance and has been increasing in Northern hemisphere, especially in the United States (US) and Western Europe. It occurs more commonly in males in the fourth and fifth decades of life. Among all cancers, HCC is one of the fastest growing causes of death in the US and poses a significant economic burden on healthcare. Chronic liver disease due to hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus and alcohol accounts for the majority of HCC cases. Incidence of nonalcoholic fatty...
Source: Journal of Carcinogenesis - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Carcinog Source Type: research
Liver cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide and is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality [1,2]. In Taiwan, approximately 7000 patients die each year from liver cancer. The main reasons are alcohol abuse [3] and a high prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C, which progress to chronic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [4]. One study found that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is common in diabetes patients [5], and several liver-related diseases including alcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cirrhosis may also increase the risk of liver cancer development [6–8].
Source: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Source Type: research
We examined Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (2004‐2009) with Medicare‐linkage files for HCC, which was identified by the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, third edition codes using topography and morphology codes 8170‐8175. Medicare‐linked data was used to identify NAFLD, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and other liver disease using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. NAFLD was also defined by clinical diagnosis (cryptogenic cirrhosis, obese‐diabetics with cryptogen...
Source: Hepatology - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Steatohepatitis and Metabolic Liver Disease Source Type: research
We examined SEER registries (2004‐2009) with Medicare‐linkage files for HCC which was identified by the ICD‐O‐3 codes using topography and morphology codes 8170‐8175. Medicare‐linked data was used to identify NAFLD, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and other liver disease using ICD‐9‐CM codes. NAFLD was also defined by clinical diagnosis (cryptogenic cirrhosis, obese‐diabetics with cryptogenic liver disease). Logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of HCC. In addition, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for...
Source: Hepatology - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Steatohepatitis and Metabolic Liver Disease Source Type: research
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