Subjective Global Assessment Remains an Important Nutrition Assessment Tool: Response to Marcelli, DiBenedetto, Ciotola, Grassmann, and Canaud

We thank Drs. Marcelli, DiBenedetto, Ciotola, Grassmann, and Canaud for their response1 to our article titled “Subjective Global Assessment Scores Have Poor Correlation with Serum Albumin in Obese Patients.”2 We agree with these authors and attempted to point out in our analysis that while albumin is not pure nutrition marker, it is highly prognostic of morbidity3 and is considered a key quality indicator by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services,4 the main payer for dialysis in the United States.
Source: Journal of Renal Nutrition - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

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2017 ended as a banner year for my family, but things didn’t look great at the start. A death sentence met us in a boxing ring, and we had to school ourselves on fighting to live. I never thought much about the 37 million American adults who suffer from kidney disease until my husband Neil became one of them. Celebrating our first year of marriage in 2001, we learned by accident through an unrelated medical exam that my husband has polycystic kidney disease, an illness which causes the kidneys to fill with cysts over time, rendering the organs unable to function properly. There is no cure. There was nothing to do but...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Healthcare medicine public health Source Type: news
sti R Abstract Protein carbonylation is a marker of oxidative protein damage, that is likely involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protein carbonyl (PC) groups in different clinical conditions. It included different groups of subjects: 81 trained subjects; 23 subjects with mild essential hypertension; 31 middle-aged subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS); 106 subjects with MS not selected for age (subdivided into two subgroups, with and without diabetes mellitus); 91 obese adults subdivided in two subgroups (BMI 30-35 Kg/m2 and BMI > 35 kg/m2); 48 subject...
Source: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Clin Hemorheol Microcirc Source Type: research
ConclusionIn this large observational study using a national clinical database, obese patients undergoing PD for head of pancreas cancer had increased risk of postoperative complications and mortality in comparison to controls.
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract Ten percent of the world's population is affected by chronic kidney disease that can lead to kidney failure. In France, nearly three million people are concerned, half of whom are undiagnosed, 85,000 people are on dialysis or waiting for a kidney transplant. Each year, 11,000 new diagnoses of severe renal failure are made, one third of which had not been treated before. Kidney failure is constantly increasing due to the aging of the population and the resurgence of chronic diseases, including obesity and cardiovascular diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes, two conditions that impair...
Source: Nephrologie and Therapeutique - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Nephrol Ther Source Type: research
Morbid obesity (body mass index ≥35 kg/m2) is both common and growing among patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the United States. An estimated 20% of adult ESKD patients live with morbid obesity, representing over 140,000 people [1]. Due in part to poor post-operative outcomes, these patients have limited access to transplantation, as most transplant centers utilize a body mass index cutoff of 35-40 kg/m2 [2-4]. Many of these patients remain relegated to long-term dialysis with an estimated survival of less than 50% at 5 years compared to greater than 85% with a kidney transplant [5-8].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Morbid obesity (body mass index ≥35 kg/m2) is both common and growing among patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the United States. An estimated 20% of adult patients with ESKD live with morbid obesity, representing over 140,000 people [1]. Due in part to poor postoperative outcomes, these patients have limited acces s to transplantation, as most transplant centers use a body mass index cutoff of 35 to 40 kg/m2 [2–4]. Many of these patients remain relegated to long-term dialysis with an estimated survival of85% with a kidney transplant [5 –8].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research
The objective of this review is to show an overview to know the main UT produced in end-stage renal disease patients, and how prebiotics and probiotics intervention acts as a helpful tool in CKD treatment.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Morbid obesity can increase risk of complications after renal transplantation. There is a paucity of literature on bariatric surgery outcomes in renal transplant candidates. The primary objective was to study effectiveness of bariatric surgery as a weight reduction strategy in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients to qualify for renal transplantation.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
41-year-old male with a history of single-anastomosis duodeno-ileal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy(SADI-S) in 2014 presented in 3 years later with liver cirrhosis related to protein malnutrition. At the time, reversal was discussed but the patient did not follow-up. Patient re-presented to the clinic 2 years later with continued weight loss, severe malnutrition with liver cirrhosis, and renal failure requiring dialysis. He was taken back to the operating room(OR) for conversion of SADI-S to mini gastric bypass.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsWe found that among individuals with stage 3 and 4 CKD, PTH was an independent predictor of fractures, vascular events, and death. Additional epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm these findings. If a target PTH range can be confirmed, then randomized placebo-controlled trials will be needed to confirm that treating HPT reduces the risk of fracture, vascular events, and death.
Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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