Sex-Based Differences in Chronic Total Occlusion Management

AbstractᅟChronic total occlusions (CTOs) are an important and increasingly recognized subgroup of coronary lesions, documented in at least 30%, but up to 52% of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary angiography. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of these lesions is increasingly pursued, with excellent success rates.Purpose of ReviewIt is known that gender differences exist in the presentation of CAD, as well as in clinical outcomes after routine PCI; however, it is not well described how these differences pertain to management of CTOs. This review summarizes the available data regarding sex-based differences in CTO management and outcomes.Recent FindingsWomen comprise approximately 20% of CTO registry and trial participants.SummaryAs has been demonstrated in PCI studies, women comprise a minority of patients in CTO PCI registries and trials. Sex-based differences exist in complication rates, collateral formation, and outcomes and need further evaluation in future studies.
Source: Current Atherosclerosis Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Authors: Hou C, Zheng B, Wang XG, Zhang B, Shi QP, Chen M Abstract Previous studies have reported that short-term statin loading effectively protects statin-naive patients with mild renal insufficiency from contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with more advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and long-term statin therapy also benefit from high-loading statin pretreatment. A total of 256 consecutive patients with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving long-term statin therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery an...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
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Source: Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: COMPLEX ISSUES IN CORONARY REVASCULARIZATION: Edited by Bobby Yanagawa and Subodh Verma Source Type: research
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Source: Coronary Artery Disease - Category: Cardiology Tags: CT Angiography for CAD Source Type: research
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Source: Coronary Artery Disease - Category: Cardiology Tags: PCI Source Type: research
Conditions:   Type 2 Myocardial Infarction;   Coronary Artery Disease;   Percutaneous Coronary Intervention;   Critical Illness Intervention:   Procedure: percutaneous coronary intervention (stenting) Sponsor:   University Medical Centre Ljubljana Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Clinical perspectives Source Type: research
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