Long-Term Trajectories of Mild Asthma in Adulthood and Risk Factors of Progression

Publication date: November–December 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 6, Issue 6Author(s): Wenjia Chen, J. Mark FitzGerald, Larry D. Lynd, Don D. Sin, Mohsen SadatsafaviBackgroundMost patients with asthma have mild disease. However, the clinical course of mild asthma and risk factors for progression are not well studied.ObjectiveTo examine the long-term trajectories of mild asthma and the effects of early-stage risk factors on the subsequent disease course.MethodsFrom the administrative health data of British Columbia, Canada, we identified patients aged 14 to 45 years with newly diagnosed mild asthma between January 1997 and December 2012. For each follow-up year, we categorized a patient's asthma severity into mild/dormant, moderate, or severe on the basis of the intensity of asthma medications and occurrence of exacerbations. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the probability of severity or all-cause death in the next year as a function of a patient's severity history in the past 3 years and selected baseline risk factors.ResultsThe study included 70,829 patients with incident mild asthma (62% women; mean age, 31 years). Over 10 years, 8% of these patients transitioned to moderate or severe asthma. Inappropriate use of rescue medications and older age were the most influential determinants for progression from mild asthma (odds ratios, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.68-1.90; P
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a nasal inflammatory response caused by an exaggerated immunological reaction to an allergen that is generally characterized by one or more symptoms of nasal congestion, sneezing, rhinorrhea, and nasal itching.1 AR is one of the most common chronic diseases in both pediatric and adult patients, affecting 5.6 million children2 and 19.9 million adults in the US.3 While AR is typically categorized as perennial (PAR; occurring year-round) or seasonal (SAR; occurring in a specific pollen season), the distinction between these can be difficult to determine as some patients can have both SAR and PAR, and...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Acta Dermato-Venereologica - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Acta Derm Venereol Source Type: research
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Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, predominantly type 2 inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 10% of adults and 20% of children [1 –5]. Moderate-to-severe AD is characterized by extensive eczematous lesions, pronounced persistent, severe itch [6–8], substantial pain and discomfort [9–12], and is frequently associated with other type 2 (atopic/allergic) comorbidities, e.g. asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), eosinophilic esophagitis, and food allergies [8,13–15], and a significant disease burden, e.g.
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Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
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Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Reviews and feature article Source Type: research
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