Use of Seva Stress Release Acupressure to Reduce Pain, Stress, and Fatigue in Patients Hospitalized for Cancer Treatment

Patients undergoing treatment for cancer often experience stress, fatigue, and pain during their treatment. Medical management of these symptoms can cause additional adverse effects, but it is possible that noninvasive complementary therapies may be able to reduce these symptoms without unwanted adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and impact of the Seva Stress Release acupressure protocol on stress, fatigue, pain, and vital signs of patients hospitalized for cancer treatment. Thirty patients receiving cancer treatment and experiencing stress, fatigue, and pain were recruited for the study. After obtaining informed consent, baseline data (survey and vital signs) were obtained, followed by administration of the Seva Stress Release. After the intervention, vital signs were obtained, and patients completed 2 additional surveys. After Seva, patient stress, fatigue, pain, heart rate, and respirations were significantly decreased (P = .000). Sixty-six percent of participants experienced symptom relief for at least 1 to 4 hours. Qualitative findings also indicated that patients reported better sleep and mental clarity after the intervention. The Seva protocol could be taught to nurses and be used as an independent intervention for patients experiencing adverse effects of cancer treatment, to promote comfort and reduce stress and fatigue.
Source: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Symptom Management Series Source Type: research

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Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Prevention and Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Who do you think understands more about bipolar disorder: a psychiatrist or a patient with the illness? In this Not Crazy podcast, we discuss whether a patient can be considered a mental health expert without all the credentials after their name. Today we invite writer and bipolar advocate Natasha Tracy — who also has bipolar disorder — to the show to give her opinion. Would you seek advice from a patient? Join us for an in-depth discussion on mental health patients as experts. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Remember to Rate &Review Us!   Guest Information for &lsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs
Who do you think understands more about bipolar disorder: a psychiatrist or a patient with the illness? In this Not Crazy podcast, we discuss whether a patient can be considered a mental health expert without all the credentials after their name. Today we invite writer and bipolar advocate Natasha Tracy — who also has bipolar disorder — to the show to give her opinion. Would you seek advice from a patient? Join us for an in-depth discussion on mental health patients as experts. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Remember to Rate &Review Us!   Guest Information for &lsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs
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Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: J Rehabil Med Source Type: research
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Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Rev Bras Enferm Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Natl Compr Canc Netw Source Type: research
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