No Autism Link to Many Depression, Psychosis Drugs in Pregnancy

(MedPage Today) -- Exploratory study shows maternal health may be more important than medications
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

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This study investigated whether antenatal exposure to antidepressants (ADs) increases the risks of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, and cognitive and developmental deficits in infants or preschool children. PubMed, EMBASE, BIREME/BVS databases were searched to identify studies examining associations of ADs in pregnancy with neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Twenty studies addressed ASD and/or ADHD risks while 30 focused on developmental and cognitive deficits in infants or preschool children. Most studies detected no ass...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
(University of Cambridge) Autistic mothers are more likely to report post-natal depression compared to non-autistic mothers, according to a new study of mothers of autistic children carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge. A better understanding of the experiences of autistic mothers during pregnancy and the post-natal period is critical to improving wellbeing.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionsAutistic mothers face unique challenges and the stigma associated with autism may further exacerbate communication difficulties. Greater understanding and acceptance amongst individuals who interact with autistic mothers is needed, and autistic mothers would benefit from additional and better-tailored support.
Source: Molecular Autism - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
AbstractExposure to gestational stress is implicated in increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders in offspring. We assessed association between prenatal exposure to a 1-month period of repeated rocket attacks during the 2006 Second Lebanon War in Northern Israel and emergence of childhood neuropsychiatric disorders from birth through 9  years of age. Children born to women who were pregnant during the war (N = 6999) were identified and compared to children in the same district born a year later (N = 7054), whose mothers were not exposed to rocket attacks during pregnancy. Multivariable ...
Source: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? – An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans Fernanda Serpeloni1,2, Karl M. Radtke1,3, Tobias Hecker4, Johanna Sill1, Vanja Vukojevic5, Simone G. de Assis2, Maggie Schauer1, Thomas Elbert1 and Daniel Nätt6* 1Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany 2Department of Studies in Violence and Health Jorge Careli, National School of Public Health of Rio de Janeiro – National Institute of Women, Children and Adolescents Health Fernandes Figueira, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Autism spectrum disorder and depression were more common in Swedish children and adults born to mothers who had experienced infections during pregnancy while hospitalized, according to astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry. The study is one of the first to evaluate a generalized effect of infection and inflammation during pregnancy on a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders, wrote the authors.“The developmental origins of mental illness are incompletely understood,” wrote Benjamin al-Haddad, M.D., M.Sc., Ph.D., of the Seattle Children’s Hospital and University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues. &ldquo...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: autism Benjamin al-Hadad bipolar disorder depression infection pregnancy psychosis urinary tract infection Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
Source: Clinical Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Clinical Epidemiology Source Type: research
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year Related items fromOnMedica NHS funding boost to support new mothers ’ mental health Maternal suicides remain a concern, report shows Valproate in pregnancy linked to raised autism risk Doctors urged to spot victims of trafficking Preterm birth risk higher after PTSD and major depression
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
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