Update: Only 5% of US children ages 8 –11 follow guidelines recommended for brain development

___ Dear reader, Time for SharpBrains monthly e-newsletter, discussing the latest innovations for brain health and mental health, and opening in this occasion with an important wake-up call. New research: Only 5% of US children ages 8–11 follow screen time, sleep and exercise guidelines recommended for brain development Neurofeedback or medication to treat ADHD? New study reinforces need for proactive cognitive monitoring after heart surgery One-week brain training can increase cognitive flexibility and reduce OCD symptoms New tools: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation shows early promise to ameliorate depression, especially if combined with other therapies and dosage optimized 10-minute cognitive test MoCA helps predict long-term motor, cognitive and mortality outcomes after stroke The Ontario Brain Institute selects 6 neurotech start-ups for ONtrepreneurs program Anticipating ethical implications of DARPA’s neurotechnology push New thinking: Time to adopt Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) as a public health intervention to ease depression? Towards a new culture of Brain Health and Brain Fitness Best predictor of sustained weight-loss? Prefrontal cortex activation Helius Medical and HealthTech Connex partner to develop neuroplasticity clinics in Canada   Happy Halloween and have a great month of November,   The SharpBrains Team
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology brain-development Brain-health cognitive monitoring cognitive-therapy innovation medication Mental-Health Neurofeedback neur Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

In this study, we assessed the relationship of ΔHR (difference between resting HR and HRt) and recovery from SRC. Using a retrospective cohort design, we compared acutely (30 days) in RG (p = 0.01) and PG (p = 0.04). A ΔHR of ≤50 bpm on the BCTT is 73% sensitive and 78% specific for predicting prolonged recovery in concussed adolescents who were prescribed the current standard of care (i.e., cognitive and physical rest). Introduction Sport-related concussion (SRC), a type of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a significant public health concern (1, 2). Concussion is defined as reversible neurolog...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Diana Henz* and Wolfgang I. Schöllhorn Institute of Sports Science, Faculty of Social Sciences, Media and Sport, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany Current research demonstrates beneficial effects of physical activity on brain functions and cognitive performance. To date, less is known on the effects of gross motor movements that do not fall into the category of sports-related aerobic or anaerobic exercise. In previous studies, we found beneficial effects of dynamic working environments, i.e., environments that encourage movements during cognitive task performance, on cognitive performance ...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Conclusion. Modafinil is a central nervous system stimulant with well-established effectiveness in the treatment of narcolepsy and shift-work sleep disorder. There is conflicting evidence about the benefits of modafinil in the treatment of fatigue and EDS secondary to TBI. One randomized, controlled study states that modafinil does not significantly improve patient wakefulness, while another concludes that modafinil corrects EDS but not fatigue. An observational study provides evidence that modafinil increases alertness in fatigued patients with past medical history of brainstem diencephalic stroke or multiple scleros...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review excessive daytime sleep fatigue head injury modafinil stroke TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research
A diagnosis of epilepsy can seem overwhelming: You likely have a lot of questions about how seizures — and their treatment — will affect your child’s life and what that might mean for your family. That’s why education is crucial for helping ensure that you understand as much as possible about the condition. Events such as the Fifth Annual Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland are wonderful opportunities to learn from experts and from other families. Here, Dr. Arnold Sansevere of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital answers five common questions from parents and kids. What causes s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Ask the Expert Diseases & Conditions Dr. Arnold Sansevere epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news
AbstractTourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by both motor and phonic tics over a period of at least 1  year with the onset in childhood or adolescence. Apart from the tics, most of the patients with Tourette syndrome have associated neuropsychiatric comorbidities consisting of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, rage attacks, sleep issues, depression, and migrai ne. Patients may also have physical complications directly from violent motor tics which can rarely include cervical myelopathy, arterial dissection, and stroke. The purpose of this article is to...
Source: Current Developmental Disorders Reports - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
As part of the team at Experiment.com, a crowdfunding platform for science, I get to talk to scientists all the time. I've been an insomniac and poor sleeper all my life, so I decided to run a Sleep Challenge Grant to launch a batch of sleep experiments together on the site. Here's what I'm learning from 10 scientists at the forefront of sleep research: Men who go to sleep late have more sex. "Evening men," who naturally wake up later and go to sleep later, tend to have higher mating success but lower success in social settings like school or business. Dr. Christoph Randler wants to investigate whether there ar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Evaluating the potential harms of a commonly used drug—especially a complex substance like marijuana—is a challenging but vital task. Fully informed awareness of both the potential and proven benefits and the potential and proven harms of marijuana are necessary in order to have rational discussions with patients, teens, and decision makers regarding marijuana use. Based on a review of the current literature, we suggest the mnemonic DDUMB (dependence, driving, underachievement, mental illness, and “bad to worse”) as a tool that captures several of the more well-supported, brain-based risk...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Child Adol Mental Disorders Cognition Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Review Substance Use Disorders Cannabis dependence drug-related har Source Type: research
Conclusion Healthcare providers in general, and specifically those in the mental health and substance abuse fields, should keep in mind that nootropic use is an under recognized and evolving problem. Nootropic use should be considered in cases where there are sudden or unexplained exacerbations of psychiatric symptoms in patients who have been stable and medication adherent. It is also important to remember that most nootropics are not detected on standard drug toxicology screening tests. We have very little clinical information on how nootropics may interact with psychotropics (or other medications) and potentially cause ...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Series and Literature Review Current Issue Mental Disorders Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Substance Use Disorders Ampakines Armodafinil brain enhancer Cerebrolysin Citicoline cognitive enhancer homeopathic medicine natural r Source Type: research
Conclusion Given emerging evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in the electron transport chain needed for cellular energy production, is an underlying pathophysiological mechanism for some varieties of ASD, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease, especially when they encounter a patient with unusual neurological or constitutional symptoms. The prevalence of mitochondrial disease in ASD patients may be as high as five percent, which means that it is not the “zebra”[27] diagnosis that it might be in a non-ASD patient, where prevalence is about 0.01 percent.10 R...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Anxiety Disorders Asperger's syndrome Autism Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Case Report Current Issue Intellectual Disability Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Pervasive Developmental Disorders ASD autism spectrum disorder dysauton Source Type: research
In this study, about 5% of patients given any dosage of Vyvanse had to discontinue its use because of adverse effects.  3/196 patients initially randomized to Vyvanse had serious adverse effects, and one patient died, apparently of an amphetamine overdose.  Oddly, the article declared that the one death, due to methamphetamine overdose, was thought by a study investigator not to be related to treatment with another amphetamine, lisdexamfetamine.  That makes little sense, given that in a randomized controlled trial, the presumption is that differences in groups given different treatments were caused by these ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: clinical trials conflicts of interest deception evidence-based medicine FDA marketing Shire stealth marketing Source Type: blogs
More News: ADHD | Brain | Canada Health | Cardiology | Child Development | Children | Cognitive Behavior Therapy | Depression | Education | Heart | International Medicine & Public Health | Learning | Medical Ethics | Men | Neurology | Neuroscience | Neurosurgery | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Sports Medicine | Stroke | Study | Training | Universities & Medical Training | Weight Loss