Let ’s Talk about Health Workers’ Feelings

October 30, 2018Conversations between health workers and members of key populations can transform the health care experience for both.It is easy to forget that doctors, nurses, and other health care workers are just like everyone else. They even have feelings.At a recent Health4All training, a social worker in Suriname explained, “Health workers say that they don’t want to put aside their upbringing or values, and they don’t want to say ‘ma’am’ when you are a biological man. They say, ‘If you have a name like Trixie, I will call you Trixie, but I will not call you ma’am. What about my feelings?’”Health workers ’ feelings—as well as a constellation of other factors, including cultural norms, beliefs, and structural inequities—guide how they behave toward and deliver services to key populations. Unfortunately, many members of key populations report unwelcoming, disrespectful, or discriminatory treatme nt by health workers that directly affects whether they will seek or continue HIV services.The ripple effect of stigma and discrimination remains a major barrier to epidemic control.After so much incredible progress toward controlling the HIV epidemic, the powerful ripple effect of stigma and discrimination across the HIV cascade remains a major barrier to epidemic control.That is why  LINKAGES is learning how to talk with health workers about their feelings in productive ways—and truly tackle how to support health workers to provide key populations ...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news