Tanzania:Over 40% of Children Under Five Don't Use Medicated Nets

[Daily News] ABOUT 46 per cent of children below five years are at high risk of contracting malaria in Mainland Tanzania because they don't sleep under insecticide treated nets (ITNs), a new survey shows.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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By SIMON YU, MD, LT COL, USA (Ret) Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opened up a new front in the Coronavirus War by saying we don’t just need to treat the acute disease, we need to treat the underlying conditions that make people more susceptible to serious disease progression. He focused on heart disease, and managing mitigating risk factors such as CVD, diabetes, hypertension and smoking in order to increase people’s odds for recovery. The initial focus has been pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with risk factors including ast...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 CDC chronic disease holistic care Pandemic SDoH Source Type: blogs
 It’s often said that fear is the most dangerous virus on the planet. While a relatively small percentage of people will contract the new coronavirus, or COVID-19, the fear it provokes will chip away at the mental health of nearly everyone who hears about it. So why does COVID-19 inspire so much fear when there are other diseases lurking in the shadows? And what can we do about it? In today’s podcast, our guest Dr. David Batman, a registered medical practitioner in the U.K., discusses how this high level of unprecedented global panic is being intensified by the non-stop media, and specifically, social media....
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Interview Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
DiscussionThe study builds on the experience and lessons of a previous study conducted in South Africa. It involves three African countries with different social-ecological contexts to investigate whether results are generalisable across the continent.Trial registrationThe study was registered on August 9, 2018, with ISRCTN.https://doi.org/10.1186/ISRCTN29534081.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We examined factors related to the uptake of two malaria prevention measures, insecticide-treated bed-nets and prophylactic sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), among pregnant women in Nnewi, Nigeria. The survey had a quantitative and qualitative part. For each part, the subjects meeting our inclusion criteria were systematically identified in a population-based manner. For the qualitative part, focused group discussions, in-depth interviews with a wide variety of stakeholders (e.g., health workers, males whose wives are pregnant, and drug and net sellers), and key informants including doctors and nurses were held. All data co...
Source: The Scientific World Journal - Category: Science Tags: ScientificWorldJournal Source Type: research
We cover a lot of news and announcements about digital health technologies to provide context for you. Even within The Medical Futurist team, there are favorite technologies and trends. And we thought it would be time to share the technologies we’re excited about! With advancements in exoskeleton technology, A.I.’s ever-increasing importance in healthcare and technologies like 5G and quantum computing soon going mainstream, there’s much to be excited about! Without further ado, let’s jump in! 1. Quantum Computing: faster, cheaper and safer Late last month, Google claimed “quantum suprema...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine digital health Healthcare technology digital technology Source Type: blogs
Nanorobots swimming in blood vessels, in silico clinical trials instead of experimenting with drugs on animals and people, remote brain surgeries with the help of 5G networks – the second part of our shortlist on some astonishing ideas and innovations that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine is ready for you to digest. Here, we’re going beyond the first part with medical tricorders, the CRISPR/Cas-9 gene-editing method, and other futuristic medical technologies to watch for. 11) In silico clinical trials against testing drugs on animals As technologies transform every aspect of healthcare,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers 3d printing AI bioprinting blockchain clinical trials CRISPR digital digital health drug development genetics Innovat Source Type: blogs
Authors: Buguet A, Gati Ouonkoye R, Bogui P, Cespuglio R Abstract Sleeping habits and morningness-eveningness questionnaires (chronotype), and polysomnography (internal sleep organization) were proposed to healthy volunteers living under natural climates from different locations in West Africa (Niger, Côte d'Ivoire) and Central Africa (Angola, Congo). Under the Sahelian dry climate, 138 Niger medical students (130 had afternoon naps) completed 1792 sleep questionnaires during 7-day sessions in the cool-dry and hot-dry seasons. As everywhere else on Earth, daily sleep lasted 7 to 8hours. In Abidjan (hot-humid ...
Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
[Monitor] Residents of Apac District have been advised to sleep inside insecticide treated mosquito nets following rampant malaria cases in the district.
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Mosquito net use is an essential part of malaria prevention. Although previous research has shown that many people sleep under a mosquito net in endemic areas, it is unknown whether people underestimate how co...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Sean P. Saunders1, Erica G. M. Ma1,2, Carlos J. Aranda1 and Maria A. Curotto de Lafaille1,3* 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Laboratory of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, United States 2Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY, United States 3Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States The long-term effectiveness of antibody responses relies on the development of humoral immune memory. Humoral immunity is maintained by long-lived plasma ce...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
More News: Children | Malaria | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Tanzania Health