UCLA receives $1 million to support medical care for vulnerable patients

A $1 million gift from the Steven&Alexandra Cohen Foundation will advance UCLA ’s mission to provide high-quality health care for people facing financial hardship and other challenges in access to quality care, as well as providing resources to treat children who are victims of sexual assault and victims of rape.“We are grateful to the Steven&Alexandra Cohen Foundation for its gift, and its continued support of our efforts, ” said Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health, CEO of the UCLA Hospital System, and associate vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences. “Steven and Alexandra’s previous generosity has been vital to our efforts, and this timely gift will make a profound difference in the lives of so many of ou r patients.”The gift also will benefit the Rape Treatment Center at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, and Stuart House, a program within the center that serves the special needs of children who have been sexually abused. Stuart House provides free comprehensive and compassionate care 24 hours a day, including emergency medical treatment, forensic services, advocacy and trauma-informed child and family therapy. The Cohens ’ gift will make it possible for the Rape Treatment Center and Stuart House to serve to a larger geographic area of Los Angeles.“With the Cohen family’s generous support to benefit at-risk populations and theRape Treatment Center, UCLA Health can address the care needs of the most vulnera...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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WASHINGTON, D.C. - A disability insurer's conclusion that a claimant suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome, which limited long-term disability benefits to 24 months, and not from symptoms of Lyme disease was not unreasonable based on the medical evidence in the administrative record, a District of Columbia federal judge said Nov. 7 (Wesley Loucka v. Lincoln National Life Insurance Co., No. 17-1375, D. D.C., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 190935).
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News - Category: Medical Law Source Type: news
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract: Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States. After initial antibiotic treatment for patients with Lyme disease, ongoing symptoms that may persist have considerable long-term impact on healthcare costs. Posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome is characterized by a host of chronic symptoms that can leave patients physically and mentally disabled.
Source: The Nurse Practitioner - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: LYME DISEASE Source Type: research
Conclusion Through relatively small amounts of grant support over the last 6 y, CRSCI has helped local public health agencies in sixteen states and two cities—whose combined population reaches half of the U.S. total—identify critical climate impacts and vulnerable populations. In the process, the program has helped to integrate health more fully into local climate change efforts. As a result of CRSCI support, these local public health agencies—the backbone of public health climate response capacity—have tools to enhance real-life adaptive capacity and increase the effectiveness of existing intervent...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
Conclusions: The results of detection and attribution studies can inform evidence-based risk management to reduce current, and plan for future, changes in health risks associated with climate change. Gaining a better understanding of the size, timing, and distribution of the climate change burden of disease and injury requires reliable long-term data sets, more knowledge about the factors that confound and modify the effects of climate on health, and refinement of analytic techniques for detection and attribution. At the same time, significant advances are possible in the absence of complete data and statistical certainty:...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Science Selection Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our results highlight the potential for climate change to have an effect on future Lyme disease risk in Canada even if the Paris Agreement’s goal to keep global warming below 2°C is achieved, although mitigation reducing emissions from RCP8.5 levels to those of RCP6.0 or less would be expected to slow tick invasion after the 2030s. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP57 Received: 02 March 2016 Revised: 26 August 2016 Accepted: 30 August 2016 Published: 31 May 2017 Address correspondence to H. Beltrami, Earth Science Department, Physical Sciences Center, PO Box 5000, 1 West St, Antigonish, NS B2G 1W5. Tel...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
CBS Local – There are a few drawbacks to the calendar shifting to the summer months, like the influx of ticks and infections like Lyme Disease. Now doctors are cautioning of another, potentially fatal tick-borne disease: Powassan Virus. Powassan virus is even more serious than Lyme, as it causes inflammation to the brain. For the reported cases, 15 percent of those infected have died and another 50 percent have had some form of a neurological disability. As of right now, there’s no cure. Symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, loss of coordination, speech difficulties and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News powassan virus ticks Source Type: news
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Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Autoimmunity with Infection, Syphilis, Lyme, Tuberculosis, and other Bacteria Source Type: research
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