Letter to the Authors Concerning the Published Manuscript by Rial and Sastre: Food Allergies Caused by Allergenic Lipid Transfer Proteins: What Is Behind the Geographic Restriction?

Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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The prevalence of food allergy has been steadily rising worldwide with the highest incidence noted among younger children, and increasingly recognized as a growing public concern. Allergic reactions to foods often occur on the first known ingestion, suggesting that exposure of offspring to food allergens may occur in utero and/or through breast milk. This creates a milieu that shapes the neonatal immune response to these allergens. However, the effects of maternal allergen exposure and maternal sensitization with allergens on development of allergies in offspring remain controversial. This review discusses recent advances ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In analyses adjusted for immigration, Asian-American children demonstrate high risk of food allergy, eczema, and asthma, with Filipino-American children exhibiting particularly high risk.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Over the past few decades, an increase in the prevalence of asthma and food allergy has been observed in the pediatric population. In infants, food sensitization, particularly to egg, has increased the risk of developing allergic asthma. This is even more likely if sensitization to food allergens occurs early within the first few years of life. It is indeed known that both diseases may be present simultaneously in the pediatric population, but coexistence may negatively influence the severity of both conditions by increasing the risk of life-threatening asthmatic episodes as well as food-related anaphylax...
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
Peanut allergy is a generally persistent, sometimes life-threatening food allergy that is increasing in prevalence in Western countries.1 There are no FDA-approved therapies for treatment of peanut allergy, and patients must strictly avoid peanut and be prepared to use rescue medication upon symptoms due to unintentional peanut ingestion.1 However, complete avoidance of peanut is difficult at least in part due to its widespread use as a food ingredient in packaged foods and in restaurant or catered meals.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article.
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized allergies health onetime syndication Source Type: news
New-onset food allergy following transplantation is a described phenomenon, with the first case being reported in 1997.1,2 While post-transplantation food allergy (PTFA) is most common following liver transplantation with a prevalence ranging from 5.6 – 38%, new-onset food allergy has also been described following bone marrow transplantation (BMT).2-4 Tacrolimus, a medication used less frequently in BMT compared to solid organ transplantation, has been identified as a potentially modifiable risk factor for PTFA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
PMID: 31382018 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a form of desensitization proposed as a treatment for food allergy (FA). Oral immunotherapy involves feeding with increasing amounts of an allergen until a small portion is regularly tolerated. The OIT goals range from “bite safe” to induction of tolerance.1,2
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Recent publications in The Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology have documented the pain and suffering associated with cutaneous allergy.1,2 In the current issue of The Annals, Jonathan Silverberg reviews a number of comorbid health problems associated with atopic dermatitis (AD). Of greatest interest to allergists, AD predisposes to a higher risk of food allergy, eosinophilic esophagitis, and respiratory allergy.3 The systemic effects of AD are also manifested by a higher risk for infectious and cardiovascular risk.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Asthma and Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Journal of Asthma and Allergy Source Type: research
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