Lionfish venom elicits pain predominantly through the activation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors

In this study, we provide the first characterization of the pain and inflammation caused by lionfish venom and examine the mechanisms through which it causes pain using a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches including behavioral, physiological, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological testing. Intraplantar injections of the venom produce a significant increase in pain behavior, as well as a marked increase in mechanical sensitivity for up to 24 hours after injection. The algogenic substance(s) are heat-labile peptides that cause neurogenic inflammation at the site of injection and induction of Fos and microglia activation in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn. Finally, calcium imaging and electrophysiology experiments show that the venom acts predominantly on nonpeptidergic, TRPV1-negative, nociceptors, a subset of neurons implicated in sensing mechanical pain. These data provide the first characterization of the pain and inflammation caused by lionfish venom, as well as the first insight into its possible cellular mechanism of action.
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: The etiology of chronic groin pain post hernia repair is related in part to nerve injury. This is supported by the high frequency of sensory symptoms and numbness in these patients. However other factors including the role of tissue injury and inflammatory postoperative changes need to be considered. KEY WORDS: Chronic postoperative pain, Inguinal hernia repair, Open surgery, Laparoscopic surgery. PMID: 31719216 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annali Italiani di Chirurgia - Category: Surgery Tags: Ann Ital Chir Source Type: research
Abstract The Editor-in-Chief has retracted this article [1] because an investigation by Keio University has concluded that there are inaccuracies in the data reported. PMID: 31730223 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Aging Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Artificial Intelligence in MedicineAuthor(s): Anam Mustaqeem, Syed Muhammad Anwar, Muhammad MajidAbstractIn the last few years, hospitals have been collecting a large amount of health related digital data for patients. This includes clinical test reports, treatment updates and disease diagnosis. The information extracted from this data is used for clinical decisions and treatment recommendations. Among health recommender systems, collaborative filtering technique has gained a significant success. However, traditional collaborative filtering algorithms are facing ch...
Source: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine - Category: Bioinformatics Source Type: research
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the moment you have all been waiting for – the day that the winners of the Medgadget Medical Sci-Fi Competition are announced and their fantastic stories are published! First, we would like to thank Eko Devices, th...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
Why did my brother warn me against reading this book? It’s so good! I thought to myself, as I quickly devoured the pages of JoJo Moyes bestseller titled Me Before You. It was an uplifting tale about a young man who rediscovers love and laughter after a devastating spinal cord injury left him in a dangerous pool of depression. Finding myself at times in my own, albeit more shallow, pool of depression, I knew this story was exactly what I needed to remind me that I could find meaning in my life after my stroke. As I continued reading, anticipating the feel-good happy ending with a girl saving the boy's life with the po...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Education/CME Pain conditions Science in practice acceptance biopsychosocial healthcare pain management Research Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
As Republicans fall in line behind Donald Trump, despite their misgivings, many of them are urging him to “change his tone” as he moves toward the general election. But is a change in tone sufficient or even honest? Last Thursday, announcing his endorsement, Speaker Paul Ryan said, “It is my hope the campaign improves its tone as we go forward and it’s all a campaign we can be proud of.” Former Republican nominee Bob Dole says, “I can already see sort of a shift with Trump. He needs to start talking (like) he is about to be president.” Asked about Trump’s repeated commen...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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