High-intensity focused ultrasound ablation: a non-surgical approach to treat advanced and complicated liver alveococcosis

AbstractLiver alveococcosis is a life-threatening parasitic disease with progressive growth and wide metastasis to neighboring tissues, lungs, and brain. The radical treatment option is surgery along with a few chemical therapies. However, the frequency of progression and recurrence, as well as postoperative complications and mortality, remains very high. The high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment system, a therapeutic application using ultrasound to deliver heat or agitation into the body, was initially designed to treat cancer. Advanced and complicated forms of liver alveococcosis usually require surgical treatment to provide partial ectomy of necrotized liver tissue along with alveococcal caverns and sanitation of the peritoneal cavity. In this article, we presented a case of successful HIFU ablation with transhepatic puncture and drainage in treatment of complicated and advanced liver alveococcosis to avoid wide surgical treatment.
Source: Journal of Medical Ultrasonics - Category: Radiology Source Type: research

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Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news
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Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Genes Biofilms Cool Creatures Diseases Evolution Modeling Neurobiology Regeneration Research Organisms Wound Healing Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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