Evaluation of antimalarial and biochemical profiles of Abaleria ® in Plasmodium berghei -infected mice

AbstractThe rate of increasing resistance to most antimalarial drugs suggests a need for better alternatives. Hence, the present study evaluates the in vivo antimalarial and biochemical profiles of a locally formulated herbal antimalarial therapy, Abaleria ® on mice infected withPlasmodium berghei. Eight groups of five mice each were used. The control groups include uninfected, infected with 1.0  × 107P. berghei parasites but not treated, infected, and treated 3  days after inoculation with 25 mg kg−1 chloroquine diphosphate (CDP). Other groups were infected and treated with 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500  mg kg−1/day of Abaleria ® for 4 days. On the 5th day, blood smears were prepared and evaluated for parasitemia microscopically, and animals were thereafter sacrificed; serum obtained from blood samples collected through cardiac puncture was used for biochemical assays. There was a significant (p 
Source: Comparative Clinical Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Malaria disease commences when blood-stage parasites, called merozoites, invade human erythrocytes. Whilst the process of invasion is traditionally seen as being entirely merozoite-driven, emerging data sugges...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article aims to review lipid metabolism of both parasite and host, and how the former affects the latter.Recent FindingsLeishmania uses the host ’s cholesterol to ensure macrophage phagocytosis and evade immune response. Additionally, the host’s lipid bodies have key roles in disease progression and development of the parasite inside the cell. This induces changes in the patient’s serum lipid profile like hypertriglyceridemia and low H DL levels.SummaryChanges in the lipid profile and metabolism in both parasite and host during development of the disease depend on the presence of lipid bodies. Furthe...
Source: Current Tropical Medicine Reports - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
When transmitted through the oral route, Toxoplasma gondii first interacts with its host at the small intestinal epithelium. This interaction is crucial to controlling initial invasion and replication, as well as shaping the quality of the systemic immune response. It is therefore an attractive target for the design of novel vaccines and adjuvants. However, due to a lack of tractable infection models, we understand surprisingly little about the molecular pathways that govern this interaction. The in vitro culture of small intestinal epithelium as 3D enteroids shows great promise for modelling the epithelial response to i...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we phenotypically screened E. histolytica and S. mansoni in vitro with the established FT inhibitors, lonafarnib and tipifarnib, and with 125 tipifarnib analogues previously screened against both the whole organism and/or the FT of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. For E. histolytica, we also explored whether synergy arises by combining lonafarnib and metronidazole or lonafarnib with statins that modulate protein prenylation. We demonstrate the antiamebic and antischistosomal activities of lonafarnib and tipifarnib, and identify 17 tipifarnib analogues with more than 75% growth inhibition at 50 &micr...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Abstract Primary T cell immunodeficiency and HIV-infected patients are plagued by non-viral infections caused by bacteria, fungi, and parasites, suggesting an important and underappreciated role for T lymphocytes in controlling microbes. Here, we review recent studies showing that killer lymphocytes use the antimicrobial cytotoxic granule pore-forming peptide granulysin, induced by microbial exposure, to permeabilize cholesterol-poor microbial membranes and deliver death-inducing granzymes into these pathogens. Granulysin and granzymes cause microptosis, programmed cell death in microbes, by inducing reactive oxyg...
Source: Current Opinion in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Immunol Source Type: research
Alessandro Poggi1*, Roberto Benelli2, Roberta Venè1, Delfina Costa1, Nicoletta Ferrari1, Francesca Tosetti1 and Maria Raffaella Zocchi3 1Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 2Immunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 3Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy It is well established that natural killer (NK) cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Indeed, they can recognize molecules induced at the cell surface by stress signals ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Chemical Equilibrium at the Tick–Host Feeding Interface:A Critical Examination of Biological Relevance in Hematophagous Behavior Ben J. Mans1,2,3* 1Epidemiology, Parasites and Vectors, Agricultural Research Council-Onderstepoort Veterinary Research, Pretoria, South Africa 2Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 3Department of Life and Consumer Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa Ticks secrete hundreds to thousands of proteins into the feeding site, that presumably all play important functions in the modulation of host defense mech...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
In this study, we firstly tested the effects of QJSB on leucopenia using mice induced by cyclophosphamide. Our results suggested that QJSB significantly raised the number of peripheral white blood cells, platelets and nucleated bone marrow cells. Additionally, it markedly enhanced the cell viability and promoted the colony formation of bone marrow mononuclear cells. Furthermore, it reversed the serum cytokines IL-6 and G-CSF disorders. Then, using transcriptomics datasets and metabonomic datasets, we integrated transcriptomics-based network pharmacology and metabolomics technologies to investigate the mechanism of action o...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
More News: Cholesterol | Complementary Medicine | Herbs | Liver | Papanicolaou (Pap) Smear | Parasitic Diseases | Parasitology | Pathology | Study | Urology & Nephrology