A Pause in Funding Certain Types of Gain-of-Function Research

The White House announced today that U.S. government agencies will institute a pause in the funding of new “gain-of-function” research on influenza, SARS, and MERS viruses that could increase the pathogenicity or transmissibility to mammals (also see NIH Guide Notice NOT-OD-15-011). During this funding pause, the government will carry out a deliberative process to assess the risks and benefits of such studies and will develop a new Federal policy regarding the funding of this research. For those of you who may not be familiar with this topic, gain-of-function research refers to any modification of a biological agent — like viruses or bacteria — that gives it new or enhanced activity, such as the ability to infect a host. While research on factors that could increase transmission or infection can be important for informing prevention strategies, some information from these studies might also be misused for harmful purposes. Over the past several years, there has been much debate in the scientific community over the risks and benefits of gain-of-function research. The most notable source of discussion in recent years involved two studies on H5N1 — commonly known as “bird flu” — that sought to identify genetic factors that could enhance its ability to infect mammals. Many questioned whether the research findings from these two studies should be made public, and whether this type of research should even be conducted in the first pla...
Source: NIH Extramural Nexus - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Rock Talk biosecurity gain-of-function Grants policy Source Type: funding

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We describe the optimal binding features of Oseltamivir derivatives with the SARS-Cov-2 main protease (Code PDB: 6LU7) for further consideration. PMID: 32831522 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Bioinformation - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Bioinformation Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: Critical Reviews in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Crit Rev Microbiol Source Type: research
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Patients Physicians Ajay Kohli Azithromycin convalescent plasma therapy coronavirus COVID-19 treatment hydroxychloroquine Pandemic Vinay Kohli Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Population TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
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Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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