3D cell-laden polymers to release bioactive products in the eye

Publication date: Available online 18 October 2018Source: Progress in Retinal and Eye ResearchAuthor(s): Gorka Orive, Edorta Santos-Vizcaino, Jose Luis Pedraz, Rosa Maria Hernandez, Julia E. Vela Ramirez, Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Ali Khademhosseini, Nicholas A. Peppas, Dwaine F. EmerichAbstractMillions of people worldwide suffer from debilitating, progressive, and often permanent loss of vision without any viable treatment options. The complex physiological barriers of the eye contribute to the difficulty in developing novel therapies by limiting our ability to deliver therapeutics in a sustained and controlled manner; especially when attempting to deliver drugs to the posterior eye or trying to regenerate the diseased retina. Cell-based therapies offer a significant potential advancement in these situations. In particular, encapsulating, or immunoisolating, cells within implantable, semi-permeable membranes has emerged as a clinically viable means of delivering therapeutic molecules to the eye for indefinite periods of time. The optimization of encapsulation device designs is occurring together with refinements in biomaterials, genetic engineering, and stem-cell production, yielding, for the first time, the possibility of widespread therapeutic use of this technology. Here, we highlight the status of the most advanced and widely explored iteration of cell encapsulation with an eye toward translating the potential of this technological approach to the medical reality.
Source: Progress in Retinal and Eye Research - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research

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Gliomas account for approximately 80% of primary malignant tumors in the central nervous system. Despite aggressive therapy, the prognosis of patients remains extremely poor. Glioma stem cells (GSCs), considered a potential target of therapy for their crucial role in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence, are believed to be key factors in the disappointing outcome. Here, we took advantage of GSCs as the cell model to perform high-throughput drug screening, and the old antibiotic clofoctol was identified as the most effective compound, showing reduction of colony formation and induction of apoptosis of GSCs. Moreover,...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Contributors : Masahiro Hata ; Hiroto Kinoshita ; Yoku Hayakawa ; Mitsuru Konishi ; Mayo Tsuboi ; Yukiko Oya ; Hayato Nakagawa ; Hiroaki Fujiwara ; Samuel Asfaha ; Daniel L Worthley ; Yuki Muranishi ; Takahisa Furukawa ; Shunsuke Kon ; Hiroyuki Tomita ; Timothy C Wang ; Kazuhiko KoikeSeries Type : Expression profiling by arrayOrganism : Mus musculusMist1+ cells and parietal cells in mouse stomach were separatedly sorted, and RNAs were isolated.Mist1 (also known as Bhlha15) is expressed in gastric chief cells and gastric stem cells in mice. However, more specific genes for each population needs to be identified to better un...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by array Mus musculus Source Type: research
Series Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing ; Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusThis SuperSeries is composed of the SubSeries listed below.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
We report the application of chromatin immunoprecpitation (ChIP) and assay for transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC) followed by sequencing to assay chromatin response to metabolic perturbation.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
Contributors : Michael P Meers ; Derek H Janssens ; Steven HenikoffSeries Type : Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing ; OtherOrganism : Homo sapiensThough the in vitro structural and in vivo spatial characteristics of transcription factor (TF) binding are well defined, TF interactions with chromatin and other companion TFs during development are poorly understood. To analyze such interactions in vivo, we profiled several TFs across a time course of human embryonic stem cell differentiation via CUT&RUN epigenome profiling, and studied their interactions with nucleosomes and co-occurring TFs by En...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing Other Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Contributors : Hirasaki Masataka ; Akihiko Okuda ; Norihiro KotaniSeries Type : Expression profiling by arrayOrganism : Mus musculusAs a first step for identifying hypothetical splenic stem cells for nonhematopoietic cells, densely-packed colony-forming cells were isolated from mouse spleen. Those which we designated as Splenic Adherent Colony-Forming Cells (SACCs) are positive for some of stem cell markers such as alkaline phosphatase and SSEA-1 antigen. We herewith determined global expression profiles of SACCs and control splenic adherent cells.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by array Mus musculus Source Type: research
ConclusionCurrent trends in data science suggest that the ideal model for decision support in head and neck cancers should be based on human-machine collaboration, namely on: (1) software-based algorithms, (2) physician innovation collaboratives, and (3) clinician mix optimization.
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
AbstractTo investigate the effect of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) on the outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who relapsed after allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation, we performed a retrospective analysis on 218 patients with a median follow-up of 21.4 (3.4 –179.6) months. A total of 103 patients developed cGVHD, with a 2-year cumulative incidence of 48.9% (95% CI 42.1–55.7%). The estimated 3-year overall survival was 85.7% (95% CI 75.7–95.7%), 48.8% (95% CI 31.7–66.0%), and 54.1% (95% CI 44.3–63.8%) for patients with limited cGVHD, extensiv e cGVHD, and ...
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
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