Response to ustekinumab in three pediatric patients with alopecia areata

Pediatric Dermatology, EarlyView.
Source: Pediatric Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research

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This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy, recurrence rate, and safety of the new therapy with oral glycyrrhizin in adult patients with mild to moderate active AA.MethodsIt was a randomized controlled trial using two oral tablets of 25 mg glycyrrhizin three times per day (tid) for test group (65 patients), or two oral tablets of 25 mg cystine tid for the control (56 cases). Patients in both groups were also treated with topical 0.05% halometasone cream twice daily (bid). The treatment period was 24 weeks, including 12 weeks of active therapy, followed by another 12 weeks of observation.Results...
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
PMID: 31496473 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Skinmed - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Skinmed Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 September 2019Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)Author(s): M.S. Díaz, L. Morita, B. Ferrari, S. Sartori, M.F. Greco, L. Sobrevias Bonells, M.A. González-Enseñat, M.A. Vicente Villa, M. LarraldeAbstractLinear IgA bullous dermatosis is an acquired subepidermal immunoglobulin-mediated vesiculobullous disease. In this retrospective, observational, descriptive study, we describe the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of 17 patients with linear IgA bullous dermatosis. Two children had been vaccinated 2 weeks before the onset of sy...
Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results revealed a hierarchy of stigmas against hair loss, in which the media coverage marginalized this experience. The omission of hair loss by the media may explain, at least in part, why health professionals often ignore the psychosocial needs of these patients. Health insurance funding of wigs is a helpful but nevertheless insufficient solution to coping with feminine hair loss. Our findings may encourage media leaders to conduct planned media interventions to increase awareness of clinicians and health policymakers about the unique challenges faced by women coping with hair loss and promote health poli...
Source: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results revealed a hierarchy of stigmas against hair loss, in which the media coverage marginalized this experience. The omission of hair loss by the media may explain, at least in part, why health professionals often ignore the psychosocial needs of these patients. Health insurance funding of wigs is a helpful but nevertheless insufficient solution to coping with feminine hair loss. Our findings may encourage media leaders to conduct planned media interventions to increase awareness of clinicians and health policymakers about the unique challenges faced by women coping with hair loss and promote health poli...
Source: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Alopecia areata (AA), one of the most common human autoimmue diseases, is thought to be predominantly driven and can be transferred by CD8+ T cells of the Th1 type. However, CD8+ T cells are not the only drivers of disease and that subsets of NK, which can produce large amounts of IFN- γ, may also drive AA pathobiology independent of classical, autoantigen-dependent CD8+ T cell functions. Here, we have asked whether a dysregulation of innate lymphoid cells type 1 (ILC1) may play role in AA pathogenesis.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity and Inflammation Source Type: research
Chronic skin diseases have significant impacts on the quality of life (QoL) of the patients, although not life threatening. However, current QoL measurements often do not adequately reflect the actual disease burden of the affected person. Willingness-to-pay (WTP) questionnaire was developed to assess disease burden economically. In this pilot study, we evaluated QoL and WTP in patients with five chronic skin diseases; alopecia areata (AA), atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria (CU), psoriasis, and vitiligo.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research and Epidemiology Source Type: research
Alopecia areata (AA) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the attack of hair follicle (HF) autoantigens through T-cell-mediated mechanism. Beyond the hypothesis of immune privilege collapse, we suppose any change of memory regulatory T cells (mTregs) affect the balance between effector T cell subsets in AA pathogenesis. CD49a expression defines different functional subsets in Trm cells, for examples, CD8+ CD49a+ Trm cells produce IFN- γ in vitiligo lesions, whereas CD8+CD49a- Trm cells produce IL-17 in psoriatic lesions.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Adaptive Immunity and Autoimmunity Source Type: research
Alopecia areata (AA) is regarded as an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disorder. In cytokine balance of AA, several reports have suggested AA as Th1 disease. For example, Murine IFN- γ-injected C3H/HeJ mice showed AA like hair loss with infiltration of CD4+and CD8+T cells Th1 cytokine. In human, IFN-γ-producing cells were detected in the perifollicular infiltrate, and serum Th1 cytokines were increased in AA patients. On the other hand, AA often complicates atopic dermatitis ( AD). However, the immunological aspects of AA with AD are still poorly understood.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Stem Cells, Skin Appendages and Tissue Regeneration Source Type: research
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