Cholesterol Level Correlate with Disability Score in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Form of Multiple Sclerosis

Publication date: Available online 16 October 2018Source: Neuroscience LettersAuthor(s): M. Ďurfinová, Ľ. Procházková, D. Petrleničová, Z. Bystrická, K. Orešanská, Ľ. Kuračka, B. Líška
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
FINDINGSA UCLA study found that gene expression in specific cells and in specific regions of the body can provide a more precise, neuroprotective approach than traditional treatments for neurological diseases. Gene expression is the process by which genetic instructions are used to synthesize gene products, such as proteins, which go on to perform essential functions.For multiple sclerosis, specifically, increasing cholesterol synthesis gene expression in astrocytes of the spinal cord can be a pathway to repair nerves that affect walking.BACKGROUNDMultiple sclerosis is an autoimmune, neurodegenerative disease characterized...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of this pilot study, 12 weeks of concurrent high-intense interval and strength training improved resting heart rate, 2-h glucose and insulin sensitivity in multiple sclerosis but did not affect blood C-reactive protein levels, blood pressure, body composition and blood lipid profiles. Further, larger and controlled research investigating the effects of high-intense concurrent training on cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis is warranted. Implications for rehabilitation High-intensity concurrent training improves cardiovascular fitness. This pilot study explores the impa...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Trial involving almost 1,200 people aims to ‘establish definitively’ whether cholesterol drug can slow disability progressionScientists are hopeful a major drug trial will establish that statins can be used to treat multiple sclerosis.The low-cost drugs are typically prescribed to help lower levels of “bad cholesterol” associated with raised risk of a heart attack or stroke, but they have also shown “incredible promise” for the treatment of MS.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Multiple sclerosis Statins Medical research NHS Society Health Science UK news Source Type: news
Conclusions Higher levels of adiposity, non-HDL and TC/HDL ratio were prospectively associated with a higher rate of disability progression, and higher adiposity and triglycerides were associated with relapse but not with conversion to MS. Improving the lipid profile and losing weight into the healthy range could reduce the accumulation of disability.
Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Multiple sclerosis Source Type: research
Objective:To further characterise lipid biomarkers in the metabolomic profiles of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.Background:Associations between the clinical stage of MS and circulating lipoprotein-bound cholesterol have been reported (Dickens et al. 2014). A recent phase II clinical trial (Chataway et al. 2014) showing efficacy of simvastatin in treating secondary progressive MS suggests that lipid dysregulation may contribute to progression of disability.Design/Methods:Plasma samples from 27 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (12M, 15F, mean age 41.7±12.5, median EDSS 1.5 (range 1.0–7.0)), treatment free...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Biomarkers and Experimental Studies for Multiple Sclerosis II Source Type: research
This study provides additional fuel to really bolster research efforts by us and others in geroscience, a field that seeks to understand relationships between the biology of aging and age-related diseases. Aging is the most important risk factor for common chronic conditions such as heart disease, Alzheimer's and cancer, which are likely to share pathways with aging and therefore interventions designed to slow biological aging processes may also delay the onset of disease and disability, thus expanding years of healthy and independent lives for our seniors." Longer-Lived Parents and Cardiovascular Outcomes ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions While a very-low fat, plant-based diet was well adhered to and tolerated, it resulted in no significant improvement on brain MRI, relapse rate or disability as assessed by EDSS scores in subjects with RRMS over one year. The diet group however showed significant improvements in measures of fatigue, BMI and metabolic biomarkers. The study was powered to detect only very large effects on MRI activity so smaller but clinically meaningful effects cannot be excluded. The diet intervention resulted in a beneficial effect on the self-reported outcome of fatigue but these results should be interpreted cautiously as a w...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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