Assessment of signaling pathway inhibitors and identification of predictive biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma

Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare tumor principally due to past exposure to asbestos, a carcinogenic natural mineral fiber that induces genomic and genetic alterations [1]. Lack of curative treatment due to resistance to anti-cancer therapies combined with tumor aggressiveness accounts for the poor prognosis associated to MPM. Despite the significant advances in oncotherapy, MPM is still a challenging cancer to treat [2].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research

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Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and the Pacific Mesothelioma Center moved closer to a major treatment advance by obtaining U.S. patent approval for their novel mesenchymal stem cell research program. The patent approval in February makes the research program more attractive to potential investors who could accelerate development and change the way malignant mesothelioma is treated. “This is a big deal in the developmental path for MSC [mesenchymal stem cell] therapy,” Patent Adviser Dr. Walid Sabbagh told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The patent is a pathway to really help these cancer pat...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A team of researchers at the Gene Editing Institute in Newark, Delaware, has successfully treated chemotherapy-resistant lung cancer cells with the CRISPR gene-editing technique. The study was published Dec. 21, 2018, in Molecular Therapy Oncolytics. In addition to making drug-resistant lung cancer cells treatable with chemotherapy, the approach offers the potential to improve quality of life for cancer patients. “In the broader sense, such an approach would ultimately lead to a reduced level of chemotherapy required to produce the same tumor-killing activity, leading to an improvement in the quality of life of a can...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, has opened an innovative clinical trial for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma that will explore the safety and effectiveness of a novel CAR T-cell therapy. The phase I trial also is being conducted at Washington University in St. Louis. It is aimed at patients whose disease has relapsed after initial chemotherapy treatment. It involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that can help the immune system kill the cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of gene therapy that has been highly successful with blood...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusion: The approaches of this review are to highlight the recent management advances and contrast the differences of treatment practice between Western and Asian countries.
Source: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Shares in Novocure (NSDQ:NVCR) are on the rise today after the medical device maker topped revenue and losses-per-share expectations on Wall Street with its 3rd quarter earnings results. The St. Helier, N.J.-based company posted losses of $11.5 million, or 13¢ per share, on sales of $50.1 million for the 3 months ended September 30, seeing losses on the bottom-line shrink 65.8% while sales grew 131.2% compared with the same period during the previous fiscal year. Losses per share for the quarter came in under the 17¢ consensus on Wall Street, while sales beat the $43.6 million expectations on The Street. &ld...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup NovoCure Source Type: news
Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma may soon include customized gene therapy, according to thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Gene therapy involves a laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s own T cells, which are a type of white blood cell, to recognize and destroy the cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first gene therapy specifically for pediatric leukemia, signaling the start of a new approach to cancer treatment in this country. The newly approved treatment is also known as chimeric antigen rece...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: CAR T cell therapy checkpoint blockade chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy Dr. Andy Haas Dr. Prasad Adusumilli Dr. Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner gene therapy cancer gene therapy for mesothelioma immunotherapy clinical trial mali Source Type: news
Cancer patients who opt for alternative therapy instead of conventional medicine significantly decrease their chances of survival, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Although the popularity of alternative medicine continues to grow, a recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found survival rates significantly reduced for those who use it as first-line therapy. Conventional cancer treatments — chemotherapy, surgery and radiation — still produce a much better chance of survival. Mesothelioma was not included in the study, but the findings are relevant to this rare ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: acupuncture cancer Alternative medicine alternative mesothelioma treatment alternative therapy survival alternative vs conventional medicine breast cancer colon cancer Conventional cancer treatments Dr. David Gorski Dr. Skyler Johnson Source Type: news
Authors: Rimkus T, Sirkisoon S, Harrison A, Lo HW Abstract Tumor suppressor candidate 2 (TUSC2, also known as FUS1) was identified in 2000 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene located in a region on chromosome 3p21.3 that is homozygously deleted in some lung and breast cancers. The deletion is rare in lung and breast cancers, but is frequent in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Evidence to date indicates that TUSC2 behaves as a tumor suppressor in lung cancer; however, its role as a tumor suppressor for other tumor types has not been fully established. Loss of TUSC2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels has been ...
Source: Discovery Medicine - Category: Research Tags: Discov Med Source Type: research
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