Mind games: a mental workout to help keep your brain sharp

Lifestyle habits matter when it comes to brain health, and the rewards of increased mental stimulation can be seen in a very short space of timeSharon, a 46-year-old single mother of three teenagers, came to see me about her increasing forgetfulness. Working full-time and managing her household was becoming overwhelming for her, and she was misplacing lunchboxes, missing appointments and having trouble focusing her attention. She was worried because her grandmother got Alzheimer ’s disease at the age of 79, and Sharon felt she might be getting it too – just a lot younger. I said it was highly unlikely that Sharon was suffering from early-onset dementia, but I agreed to evaluate her.Whenever I consult with people about their middle-aged pauses, I first check for physical conditions or medication side-effects that might be affecting their brain health. Left untreated, high cholesterol, hypertension and other age-related illnesses can worsen memory, increase the risk of dementia, and shorten life expectancy. I also review their daily lifestyle habits to see if there are any areas they can improve to boost their brain health.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health & wellbeing Memory Life and style Mental health Psychology Source Type: news

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This study, as well as the larger SPRINT study, also demonstrated that overall intensive treatment of blood pressure in older adults is safe. However, we do know that some individuals may develop dizziness, imbalance, and in rare instances strokes with intensive blood pressure lowering. For that reason, it is important to discuss your blood pressure management with your primary care physician and follow his or her recommendation. How do cardiovascular risk factors affect brain health? We have evidence from studies of the population, studies of brain scans, and studies of animals, that treatment of cardiovascular risk facto...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Memory Prevention Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Intracranial artery calcification is common in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and the intracranial carotid artery is most frequently affected. Intracranial arterial calcifications might be associated with imaging markers of SVD and are highly correlated with WMHs, lacunes, and CMBs. Quantification of calcification on CT provides additional information on the pathophysiology of SVD. Intracranial arterial calcification could act as a potential marker of SVD. Introduction Atherosclerosis is a systemic vascular process that is considered a major cause of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular di...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Consecutive slides on axial view (≥4 consecutive slices) might be more effective than transversal diameter to identify the atherosclerotic mechanisms of SSIs in the lenticulostriate artery territory. Clinical Trial Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00664846 Introduction Single subcortical infarctions (SSIs) have been considered to be caused by lipohyalinosis degeneration in small artery disease, traditionally called lacunar infarct (1). However, atherosclerosis occurring in the parental artery blocking the orifice of the branch artery or atherosclerosis in the proxim...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Vincenzo Tigano1, Giuseppe Lucio Cascini2, Cristina Sanchez-Castañeda3, Patrice Péran4 and Umberto Sabatini5* 1Department of Juridical, Historical, Economic and Social Sciences, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy 2Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy 3Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 4ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Université de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, Toulouse, France 5Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Ita...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract Dementia is increasing in Australia in line with population ageing and is expected to peak by mid-century. The development of common forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, is associated with lifestyle-related risk factors that are prevalent among middle-aged Australians, including obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes and depression. These risk factors can be significantly ameliorated through regular participation in moderate aerobic physical activity (PA). Current national and international guidelines recommend at least 150 min of aerobic PA per week for achieving health protective...
Source: Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Aust J Prim Health Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is an age-related disease with modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and physical inactivity influencing the onset and progression. There is however, no direct evidence that reducing these risk factors prevents or slows AD. The Risk Reduction for Alzheimer's Disease (rrAD) trial is designed to study the independent and combined effects of intensive pharmacological control of blood pressure and cholesterol and exercise training on neurocognitive function.
Source: Contemporary Clinical Trials - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Bettina Maria Foidl, Christian HumpelAbstractAlzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder and the most common form of dementia coming along with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in more than 70% of all cases. However, CAA occurs also in pure form without AD pathology. Vascular life style risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, stress or an old age play an important role in the progression of CAA. So far, no animal model for sporadic CAA has been reported,...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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