Identification and characterization of ubiquitinylation sites in TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) Cell Biology

TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) forms pathological aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly in certain forms of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathological modifications of TDP-43 include proteolytic fragmentation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitinylation. A pathognomonic TDP-43 C-terminal fragment (CTF) spanning amino acids 193–414 contains only four lysine residues that could be potentially ubiquitinylated. Here, serial mutagenesis of these four lysines to arginine revealed that not a single residue is responsible for the ubiquitinylation of mCherry-tagged CTF. Removal of all four lysines was necessary to suppress ubiquitinylation. Interestingly, Lys-408 substitution enhanced the pathological phosphorylation of the immediately adjacent serine residues 409/410 in the context of mCherry-CTF. Thus, Lys-408 ubiquitinylation appears to hinder Ser-409/410 phosphorylation in TDP-43 CTF. However, we did not observe the same effect for full-length TDP-43. We extended the mutagenesis study to full-length TDP-43 and performed MS. Ubiquitinylated lysine residues were identified in the nuclear localization sequence (NLS; Lys-84 and Lys-95) and RNA-binding region (mostly Lys-160, Lys-181, and Lys-263). Mutagenesis of Lys-84 confirmed its importance as the major determinant for nuclear import, whereas Lys-95 mutagenesis did not significantly affect TDP-43's nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution, solubility, aggregation, and RNA-processing ...
Source: Journal of Biological Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Molecular Bases of Disease Source Type: research

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Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: PNAS Plus Source Type: research
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Source: Molecular Neurodegeneration - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
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