Effectiveness of two different acupuncture strategies in patients with vulvodynia: study protocol for a pilot pragmatic controlled trial

This study evaluates two different acupuncture strategies for the treatment of vulvodynia and aims to evaluate whether either of the acupuncture protocols reduce vulvar pain, pain duration or pain with intercourse. The study also examines how long the effect of acupuncture lasts in women with vulvodynia.Methods/designThe study is designed as a randomized controlled trial, focused on two acupuncture protocols. Fifty-one patients who have had vulvodynia for more than 3 months will be recruited. Among them, 34 patients will be randomized into Groups 1a and 1b; those who are unwilling to receive acupuncture will be recruited into the standard care group (Group 2). Patients in Group 1a will have acupuncture focused on the points in the pudendal nerve distribution area, while patients in Group 1b will receive acupuncture focused on traditional (distal) meridian points. Patients in Group 2 will receive routine conventional treatments, such as using pain medications, local injections and physical therapies or other nonsurgical procedures. Acupuncture will last 45 min per session, once or twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measurement will be objective pain intensity, using the cotton swab test. The secondary outcome measurement will be subjective patient self-reported pain intensity, which will be conducted before cotton swab test. Pain intensities will be measured by an 11-point Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Pain duration and pain score during intercourse are recorded. Local...
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture and laser acupuncture may have little or no effect in the short term on symptoms of CTS in comparison with placebo or sham acupuncture. It is uncertain whether acupuncture and related interventions are more or less effective in relieving symptoms of CTS than corticosteroid nerve blocks, oral corticosteroids, vitamin B12, ibuprofen, splints, or when added to NSAIDs plus vitamins, as the certainty of any conclusions from the evidence is low or very low and most evidence is short term. The included studies covered diverse interventions, had diverse designs, limited ethnic diversity, and clinical heter...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
This article describes some of the nonpharmacological treatment options and their evidence (e.g. physical therapy, massage, manual therapy, electrotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy). The evidence for an empirically detected effectiveness of all these forms of therapy is not very high and often inconsistent. Nevertheless, this does not mean that these forms of treatment should not be used but that they should be selected on an individual basis to improve the well-being of patients by being adjusted to their needs. PMID: 30374702 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Z Gerontol Geriatr Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Alpha-lipoic acid and spinal cord stimulation were effective for pain; studies were short-term with quality deficits. Spinal cord stimulation had serious adverse events. Further research should address long-term outcomes and other non-pharmacologic treatments. PMID: 30114983 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medical Research and Opinion - Category: Research Tags: Curr Med Res Opin Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 April 2018Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian StudiesAuthor(s): Tamsin L. Lee, Benjamin L. MarxAbstractPlantar fasciitis, also referred to as plantar heel pain, is a common foot pathology among runners and other athletes. The clinical guidelines of the 2014 Orthopedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association states, noninvasive therapies including manual therapy, stretching, taping, foot orthoses, and night splints are recommended as primary interventions. Recent studies suggest acupuncture may be an effective treatment compared to standard treatment for long-term r...
Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: Compared with acupuncture and sham needling, DN is more effective for alleviating pain and disability at postintervention in LBP, while its effectiveness on pain and disability at follow-up was equal to acupuncture. Besides, it remains uncertain whether the efficacy of DN is superior to other treatments. Nevertheless, considering the overall “high” or “unclear” risk of bias of studies, all current evidence is not robust to draw a firm conclusion regarding the efficacy and safety of DN for LBP. Future RCTs with rigorous methodologies are required to confirm our findings. Details of et...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to determine whether application of laser beam on acupuncture points has a positive effect on the rehabilitation of patients with a diagnosis of distal radius fracture (1.5 inches proximal to distal articular surface of the radius) when applied with active conventional physical therapy exercises. Patients with a distal radius fracture treated with closed reduction, percutaneous pinning, and a short cast for six weeks was included and were assigned to one of two study groups. The control group was given simulated laser acupuncture with the laser off, while the experimental group received lase...
Source: Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics Research - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Acupunct Electrother Res Source Type: research
Conditions:   Opioid Use;   Pain, Postoperative;   SLAP Lesion;   Bankart Lesion;   Subacromial Impingement Syndrome;   Rotator Cuff Tear;   Glenohumeral Dislocation;   Glenohumeral Subluxation;   Hill Sach Lesion;   Bony Bankart Lesion;   Acromioclavicular Separation Interventions:   Device: Battlefield Acupuncture;   Procedure: Post-surgical shoulder protocol Sponsor:   Keller Army Community Hospital Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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