Opioid Bill Shows Congress Can Still Work Together

In a week dominated by Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation battle and the partisan divisions it exposed, the Senate also showed it’s still capable of bipartisan achievements. The Senate on Wednesday passed sweeping legislation to address the opioid crisis by a 98-1 vote. The proposal, which passed the House by a margin of 393-8, is expected to be signed into law by President Donald Trump. Dubbed the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, the bill marked a rare bipartisan effort to address a national health crisis that has devastated communities all over the country. More than 200,000 people in the United States have fatally overdosed in connection to taking prescription opioids between 1999 and 2016. Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican who is one of the measure’s authors, called it a “glimmer of hope at the end of a dark tunnel” during a speech on the Senate floor before the vote. The bill addresses an archaic rule that prohibited Medicaid from reimbursing patients being treated for substance abuse disorders in facilities with more than 16 beds. Patients would be eligible for 30 days of treatment in residential facilities. The legislation lifts restrictions on who can prescribe medications to treat opioid addictions and allocates states more flexibility with funding to combat addiction. It also expands a program that seeks to arm first responders with the overdose-reversing drug naloxone and increases penalties for drug manufacturers who co...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

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Alcohol content measuring wristbands, smart lighters, nicotine tracking wearables, stop smoking apps, virtual reality therapies, automated messaging platforms are the newest elements in the arsenal of digital health technologies supporting everyone in the fight against addiction to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs. Addiction and dependency ruins lives Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life. It doesn’t matter whether it’s about cigarettes, alcohol, medication, drugs, gambling, sex, etc., any of these substances or phenomena could cause you strong dependency and might impact you...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Medical Professionals Patients Researchers alcohol cigarette digital health drugs health technology Innovation medication opioid opioid crisis smartphone smartphone apps smoking virtual Source Type: blogs
On December 5, 2017, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies held a hearing to discuss the opioid epidemic and the possible role that Congress could play in the prevention, treatment, and recovery. Senator Roy Blunt, the Subcommittee Chairman, opened the hearing by discussing the fact that overdose related deaths outnumber the deaths at the peak of the AIDS/HIV epidemic. Overdose deaths have also overtaken automobile accident fatalities to become the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. Senator Blunt also spoke about the three propos...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
I didn’t vote for you. You see, I was born with a brain injury. Doctors at Children’s Hospital in Boston told my parents I would never be able to walk normally. Young children are mean. As a young boy, insults, and laughs became a daily ritual. When I walked into a classroom, a restaurant, or down a street, people didn’t look into my eyes. They always looked down as I limped awkwardly along. But I overcame and became a varsity athlete at a prep school outside of Boston. As a teenager, I grew strong, and anybody that made fun of my limp or my awkward gate became irrelevant. Frankly, Mr. President, the day ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The Unites States of America is facing the worst health care crisis of our nation’s history. Over the past two-year period, more Americans died of opiate addiction than died in the entire Vietnam War. Drug overdoses now cause more deaths than gun violence and car crashes. In fact, accidental opioid overdoses are responsible for more deaths in 2015 than HIV/AIDS did at the height of the epidemic in 1995. However, the AIDS epidemic can be the blueprint for the United States approach to the opioid epidemic. Once America became mobilized against AIDS, Congress orchestrated intensive efforts devoted to training and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Drug and Addiction Information and Tools for Patrons and Healthcare Providers Opioid Abuse and Addiction – Contains links to the following Current News, Diagnosis and Tests, Prevention and Risk Factors, Treatments and Therapies, Clinical Trials, Journal Articles, Find an Expert, Statistics, and Research, NIH MedlinePlus Magazines MedlinePlus links to health information from the National Institutes of Health and other federal government agencies. MedlinePlus also links to health information from non-government Web sites. See MedlinePlus.gov disclaimer and quality guidelines National Library of Medicine Drug Informatio...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Resource Sharing opioid epidemic opioid resources Source Type: news
Mr. President, what in God’s name are you doing? Your Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, has turned the clock back in our country almost 35 years. Our nation’s heroin epidemic is a health crisis and will never be solved with a lock-’em-up-and-throw-away-the-key solution. Despite all intelligent research leading to a mandate conclusion that incarceration will not ever diminish drug addiction and the radical negative effects it has on our economy, “My Favorite Martian,” Jeff Sessions, has just ordered federal prosecutors to chase far harsher sentences against drug-addict-criminals. Mr. Trump, who ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The CDC recently put out apaperin their Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that studied the likelihood of long term opiate use after initial treatment with an opioid medication for acute pain. The results, for me as a regular prescriber of opioid medications, were fairly shocking. The study randomly reviewed 10% of patient records from the Lifelink database over the time period of 2006-2015. If a patient was given a prescription for an opioid for longer than 10 days, there was a 1 in 5 chance that patient would be a regular opiate user one year later. That's just staggering.Few are unaware of ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs
Check your mailbox over the next two weeks —there should be a letter from U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy, MD, calling on all physicians throughout the nation to raise awareness and further efforts to end the opioid overdose epidemic. Physicians are in a unique position of leadership when it comes to this epidemic —they are on the front lines witnessing the impact every day from emergency department overdoses to substance use disorder treatment. The letter asks directly for physicians’ help to solve and bring an end to the opioid overdose epidemic.“We will educate ourselves to treat pain safel...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusion Evaluating the potential harms of a commonly used drug—especially a complex substance like marijuana—is a challenging but vital task. Fully informed awareness of both the potential and proven benefits and the potential and proven harms of marijuana are necessary in order to have rational discussions with patients, teens, and decision makers regarding marijuana use. Based on a review of the current literature, we suggest the mnemonic DDUMB (dependence, driving, underachievement, mental illness, and “bad to worse”) as a tool that captures several of the more well-supported, brain-based risk...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Child Adol Mental Disorders Cognition Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Review Substance Use Disorders Cannabis dependence drug-related har Source Type: research
During a recent campaign stop, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton promised to make the "quiet epidemic" involving heroin and prescription opioids an important part of her presidential campaign -- and, presumably, of her presidency, should she be elected. She mentioned the issue of substance misuse again in her highly publicized speech on criminal justice reform last week. As someone intimately familiar with the devastating impact of this public health crisis on individuals, families and communities, I was very pleased to hear this, and thought of several ways she could make good on her pledge. Here are fi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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