GSE113090 Deep sequencing of transcript levels of human embryonic stem cell derived mesothelium (epithelial and mesenchymal forms) and mesothelium from neonatal mouse E15.5 of the heart, lung, liver and gut and ChIP-seq data of the mesenchymal form of mesothelium

Contributors : Stephen Dalton ; Thomas Colunga ; Miranda Hayworth ; Luoman Chen ; Kristopher L NazorSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing ; Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiens ; Mus musculusMesothelium is a multipotent resident progenitor cell of the coelomic organs that functions in organogenesis, repair and possible regeneration. We used hESCs to generate mesothelium of the epithelial and mesenchymal forms. Mesenchymal derivatives of mesothelium have been previously reported to function in tissue repair by promoting and participating in angiogenesis and neovascularization. We uncovered that hESC-derived mesothelium of the mesenchymal form (MesoT) are multipotent and generate smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and pericytes and self-assemble into vessel-like networks in vitro. MesoT cells contribute to nascent coronary vessels in the repair zone of mechanically damaged neonatal mouse hearts. MesoT cells seeded onto vascular scaffolds self-assemble into vasculature capable of supporting peripheral blood flow following transplantation. Our findings demostrate the potential utility of MesoT cells in tissue repair and vascular engineering applications.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Mus musculus Source Type: research

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In this study, a significant (30%) increase in maximum lifespan of mice was found after nonablative transplantation of 100 million nucleated bone marrow (BM) cells from young donors, initiated at the age that is equivalent to 75 years for humans. Moreover, rejuvenation was accompanied by a high degree of BM chimerism for the nonablative approach. Six months after the transplantation, 28% of recipients' BM cells were of donor origin. The relatively high chimerism efficiency that we found is most likely due to the advanced age of our recipients having a depleted BM pool. In addition to the higher incorporation rates, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation could be use as a potential treatment for PHLF. Introduction Partial hepatectomy is an important treatment for benign and malignant liver diseases. Although the liver can be completely regenerated after partial excision or injury, at least 1/3 of the liver should be retained in most of the patients, and 40–50% should be retained in patients with parenchymal liver disease (Adams et al., 2013; Cieslak et al., 2014). Postoperative complications, such as acute post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) or small liver syndrome, may occur when the scope of excision is to...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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