GSE113090 Deep sequencing of transcript levels of human embryonic stem cell derived mesothelium (epithelial and mesenchymal forms) and mesothelium from neonatal mouse E15.5 of the heart, lung, liver and gut and ChIP-seq data of the mesenchymal form of mesothelium

Contributors : Stephen Dalton ; Thomas Colunga ; Miranda Hayworth ; Luoman Chen ; Kristopher L NazorSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing ; Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiens ; Mus musculusMesothelium is a multipotent resident progenitor cell of the coelomic organs that functions in organogenesis, repair and possible regeneration. We used hESCs to generate mesothelium of the epithelial and mesenchymal forms. Mesenchymal derivatives of mesothelium have been previously reported to function in tissue repair by promoting and participating in angiogenesis and neovascularization. We uncovered that hESC-derived mesothelium of the mesenchymal form (MesoT) are multipotent and generate smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and pericytes and self-assemble into vessel-like networks in vitro. MesoT cells contribute to nascent coronary vessels in the repair zone of mechanically damaged neonatal mouse hearts. MesoT cells seeded onto vascular scaffolds self-assemble into vasculature capable of supporting peripheral blood flow following transplantation. Our findings demostrate the potential utility of MesoT cells in tissue repair and vascular engineering applications.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Genome binding/occupancy profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Mus musculus Source Type: research

Related Links:

Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion of Mitochondrial Hormesis as an Approach to Slow Aging Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist An Interview with Reason at the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation An Interview on Mitochondrial Damage and Dysfunction in Aging An Interview with Vadim Gladyshev on Research into the Causes of Aging An Interview with Jim Mellon, and Update on Juvenescence A Lengthy Interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation An Interview with Peter de Keize...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We report that the disruption of excitation-contraction coupling contributes to impaired force generation in the mouse model of Sod1 deficiency. Briefly, we found a significant reduction in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity as well as reduced expression of proteins involved in calcium release and force generation. Another potential factor involved in EC uncoupling in Sod1-/- mice is oxidative damage to proteins involved in the contractile response. In summary, this study provides strong support for the coupling between increased oxidative stress and disruption of cellular excitation contraction mac...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we investigate mitochondrial energetics and mtDNA methylation in senescent cells, and evaluate the potential of humanin and MOTS-c as novel senolytics or SASP modulators that can alleviate symptoms of frailty and extend health span by targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics. Exercise versus the Hallmarks of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/06/exercise-versus-the-hallmarks-of-aging/ The paper I'll point out today walks through the ways in which exercise is known to beneficially affect the Hallmarks of Aging. The Hallmarks are a list of the significant causes of aging that I dis...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Cardiology | Gastroschisis Repair | Genetics | Heart | Heart Transplant | Liver | Liver Transplant | Lung Transplant | Perinatology & Neonatology | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Transplants | Urology & Nephrology