Infectious Complications in Pancreas Transplantation

AbstractPurpose of ReviewIn addition to the infectious risk associated with all solid organ transplants, pancreas transplantation poses some unique risks associated with surgical technique and host risk factors. This review highlights several key areas of infectious diseases that physicians must consider in patients undergoing pancreas transplantation.Recent FindingsSurgical site infections are common after pancreas transplantation, and empiric antimicrobials, including antifungal coverage, are often needed to reduce the risk of these infections. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections require close monitoring post-transplant, and we are just beginning to understand risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, which is often associated with EBV infection in these patients.SummaryPancreas transplantation can be a successful cure for diabetes, if post-transplant complications, including rejection and infection, can be appropriately managed. Recent use of pancreata from HIV- and HCV-positive donors has increased the pool of possible donors, and ideally, more centers will begin to use these organs. Islet cell transplantation and xenotransplantation are exciting new avenues of research for potential diabetes cures.
Source: Current Transplantation Reports - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: JAMA Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research
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Source: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Exp Clin Transplant Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Thoracic Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Thorac Dis Source Type: research
More News: Cytomegalovirus | Diabetes | Endocrinology | Infectious Diseases | Pancreas | Transplants