What Causes Hyperkalemia?

Discussion Potassium (K+) is an alkali metal (Group 1 of periodic table with Hydrogen, Lithium and Sodium) with an anatomic number of 19. Its chemical symbol K, comes from the medieval Latin, kalium which means potash (mainly potassium carbonate or potassium hydroxide), the substance it was first isolated from. Potassium is an important cation and it mainly resides in the intracellular fluid with only a small amount in the extracellular fluid. Potassium regulates cell volume, pH and enzyme functions. Hyperkalemia is defined as a potassium level> 5.5 mEq/L in children and> 6.0 mEq/L in newborns. Hyperkalemia increases cellular membrane excitability and can cause significant problems with the myocardium, resulting in potentially lethal dysrhythmias. The problem is that hyperkalemia can be completely asymptomatic for the patient and even on ECG. First ECG changes are peaked T waves occurring around> 5.6 mEq/L. With increased K+ levels, the PR interval prolongs and the QRS complex becomes widened. Physical symptoms due to hyperkalemia include muscle weakness, reduced deep tendon reflexes, and paresthesias. Symptoms of the underlying disease obviously also occur. Hyperkalemia is a medial emergency because of its cardiac problems. Treatment is started if there is electrocardiographic changes or serum K+> 6.0-6.5 mEq/L. K+ levels> 6.0 mEq/L are common in neonates and young children due to pseudohypokalemia (i.e. hemolysis caused by venipuncture or capillary samp...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

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Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionWe report statistically significant differences in the T1 ρ value in the superficial and middle zones of the lateral patella in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome who had no abnormalities seen on conventional MRI sequences, suggesting an alteration the macromolecular structure of the cartilage in this population.
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
We report a case of a 55-year-old patient being resuscitated emergently with proximal humeral intraosseous infusion for cardiac and respiratory arrest secondary to status epilepticus. After successful resuscitation and removal of the intraosseous cannula, the patient noted new-onset shoulder pain. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with an iatrogenic fracture of the anatomic neck of the humerus through the intraosseous needle tract when the appropriate history was obtained in conjunction with cross-sectional imaging. As the use of intraosseous access expands, such fractures may well be seen more frequently. Intraosseous ...
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractA 37-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of left hip pain. Pretherapeutic imaging demonstrated a 4  cm osteoblastoma located in the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, surrounded by extensive bone marrow edema. After multidisciplinary meeting, percutaneous cryoablation was decided and performed under computed tomography guidance using three cryoprobes to match the exact size and shap e of the tumor, resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up demonstrated resolution of the bone marrow edema pattern and ingrowth of fat at the periphery of the ablation ...
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Authors: Aparisi Á, Uribarri A Abstract Takotsubo syndrome is an acute cardiomyopathy that mimics acute coronary syndrome and is characterized by acute heart failure with reversible ventricular motion abnormalities, in the absence of justifying coronary artery disease. This document offers an exhaustive review of various proposed hypotheses that attempt to explain the pathophysiology of this disease and provides an updated review of the different classifications that have emerged in recent years. In addition, we describe the main clinical characteristics of these patients, the diagnostic tests that must be p...
Source: Medicina Clinica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med Clin (Barc) Source Type: research
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Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
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Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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