Retrosigmoid Craniotomy for Resection of an Epidermoid Cyst of the Posterior Fossa

J Neurol Surg B DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1669980This video illustrates the case of a 51-year-old woman who presented with sudden-onset headache, vertigo, and nausea. Imaging revealed an epidermoid cyst of the posterior fossa with mass effect upon the brainstem and displacement of the basilar artery. This lesion was approached using a left-sided keyhole retrosigmoid craniotomy with monitoring of the cranial nerves. This video illustrates the technique of internal debulking of the cyst contents with minimal manipulation of the cyst capsule, which is often densely adherent to the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels in the posterior fossa. Resection of the capsule is often associated with a higher rate of cranial nerve deficits. The tumor was removed completely, but the cyst capsule was left in place. The patient had House–Brackmann grade II facial paralysis postoperatively and complained of some diminished hearing in the left ear. Epidermoid cysts are benign tumors, but the patient may experience much morbidity from their overly aggressive resection, especially when the capsule is densely adhering to critical structures. An alternate strategy is to decompress the contents of the epidermoid cyst, thereby decompressing the brainstem and converting this disease process into a chronic disease that may require reoperation in the long term. Given the tight confines of the posterior fossa, aggressive internal decompression of tumors and mobilization from the brainstem and adjacent ...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Skull Base: Operative Videos Source Type: research

Related Links:

We present the case of a 39-year-old male presenting with headache, vertigo, tinnitus, hearing loss, and hoarseness. Neurological assessment showed facial paralysis House–Brackmann IV and lower cranial nerves deficits. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated two large lesions, suggestive of a glomus jugulare, and carotid body paragangliomas. Considering worsening of the symptoms and the important mass effect of both lesions over the neurovascular structures, microsurgical excision was offered, after preoperative tumor embolization. We preferred to approach both lesions in the same operation, starti...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Skull Base: Operative Videos Source Type: research
Quick, Noninvasive Approach Promising for Migraine With Vertigo
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Conclusions: Vestibular rehabilitation improved this child's quality of life. She was able to return to her daily living activities with fewer symptoms.
Source: Pediatric Physical Therapy - Category: Pediatrics Tags: CASE REPORTS Source Type: research
Conclusions and Recommendations for Clinical Practice: When an individual with Irlen syndrome complains of dizziness, ruling out a concomitant diagnosis of a central and/or peripheral vestibular disorder is warranted. What This Adds to the Evidence: The visual symptoms associated with Irlen syndrome can overlap with those of visually induced dizziness. This case report is the first to describe overlapping visual and vestibular complaints of dizziness in an individual with Irlen syndrome.
Source: Pediatric Physical Therapy - Category: Pediatrics Tags: CASE REPORTS Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Vestibular rehabilitation improved this child's quality of life. She was able to return to her daily living activities with fewer symptoms. PMID: 31568389 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Pediatr Phys Ther Source Type: research
Noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation provides rapid relief of vertigo and headache in patients with acute vestibular migraine, results of a small study suggest.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
You're reading The Mind and Body Connection; How Posture Affects Your Mood, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. We all have heard the phrase, Mind, Body, and Soul, but very few people understand how they all work together. Most people believe the phrase "I can achieve anything I put my mind to". In some cases this is true, however, when it comes to physical well-being and posture, the body plays a huge role in how we feel. The body sends messages known as "somatic markers" through neurotra...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness psychology self improvement confidence posture Source Type: blogs
Stimulating the vagus nerve appears to calm down centers in the brain that cause migraine and vertigo.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The non-invasive device, called GammaCore (pictured being used), is already available on the NHS in England to relieve cluster headaches and is also approved for 'typical' migraines in the US.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 -- People who suffer bouts of vertigo and dizziness may be suffering from a type of migraine for which treatments rarely work. But a new, preliminary study of 18 such patients found that stimulating the vagus nerve in the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
More News: Brain | Craniotomy | Headache | Migraine | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Vertigo