The changes of prevalence and etiology of pediatric pneumonia from National Emergency Department Information System in Korea, between 2007 and 2014.

CONCLUSION: The increased number of patients with pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, pleural effusion, and empyema in 2011 and 2013-2014 resulted from an MP epidemic. We provide evidence that the frequency of confirmed cases of bacterial pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia has declined from 2007 to 2014, which can simultaneously reflect the effectiveness of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID: 30274507 [PubMed]
Source: Korean Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Korean J Pediatr Source Type: research

Related Links:

Infection with influenza viruses causes substantial disease burden each year worldwide, especially for high-risk groups including children and the elderly(Heo et al., 2018, Li et al., 2019, Wang et al., 2014). Most people recover within a week without requiring medical attention, while few cases have fatal complications such as primary viral and secondary bacterial pneumonia(Gran et al., 2010). The influenza epidemic has proven to have a connection with increased mortality in many diagnoses of respiratory and circulatory diseases such as pneumonia, ischemic heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(Liu et al...
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Vidur Mahajan Vasanth Venugopal By VASANTH VENUGOPAL MD and VIDUR MAHAJAN MBBS, MBA What can Artificial Intelligence (AI) do? AI can, simply put, do two things – one, it can do what humans can do. These are tasks like looking at CCTV cameras, detecting faces of people, or in this case, read CT scans and identify ‘findings’ of pneumonia that radiologists can otherwise also find – just that this happens automatically and fast. Two, AI can do things that humans can’t do – like telling you the exact time it would take you to go from point A to point B (i.e. Google maps), or like ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence COVID-19 Health Tech AI coronavirus CT scans Pandemic Radiology Vasanth Venugopal Vidur Mahajan Source Type: blogs
The rapid spread of the coronavirus now called COVID-19 has sparked alarm worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a global health emergency, and many countries are grappling with a rise in confirmed cases. In the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising people to be prepared for disruptions to daily life that will be necessary if the coronavirus spreads within communities. Below, we’re responding to a number of questions about COVID-19 raised by Harvard Health Blog readers. We hope to add further questions and update answers as reliable information becomes available. Do...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: This analysis reveals a recent increase in pneumonia diagnosis in primary care but a contemporaneous decline in that of chest infection suggests that changes in disease labelling practice might partly account for this trend.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respiratory infections Source Type: research
ier F Abstract The development of combination antiretroviral therapies (cART) in the mid-nineties has dramatically modified the clinical presentation of critically ill HIV-infected patients. Most of cART-treated patients ageing with controlled HIV replication are nowadays admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for non-AIDS-related events, mostly bacterial pneumonia and exacerbation of comorbidities, variably impacted by chronic HIV infection - e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular diseases, or solid neoplasms. Today, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, cerebral toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis an...
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
As a medical student, the place I dreaded most was the ward at the children’s hospital where they kept the chronic ventilator patients. Unlike the other floors, where there was shouting and laughter and tears, and all the commotion and turbulence of youth, here it was dark and lifeless and eerie, with no sound except the hum of the ventilators, and the rattle of air being forced through plastic tubes. It was a place of failure and defeat, the desolate aftermath of some vast and tragic battle. An unexpected aftermath of measles My patient was a teenager who had been in a coma for years. His limbs had stubbornly twiste...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Men's Health Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Human challenge studies and systems biology approaches are important tools that should be used in concert to advance our understanding of influenza infection and provide targets for novel therapeutics and immunizations. Introduction Although influenza virus was recognized as an important pathogen over a century ago, influenza continues to cause a significant burden of disease. In the United States alone, it's estimated that in the 2017–2018 season there were 959,000 hospitalizations related to influenza illness, and 79,400 deaths (CDC, 2018). Worldwide, WHO estimates that annual influenza...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, influenza A virus infection was detected rather high with a rate of 20.5% in the study group. The monitoring of influenza virus types and subtypes is required for the evaluation of influenza vaccine strains and circulating influenza viruses and for the identification of subtypes with pandemic potential. Planning for appropriate antiviral therapy using real-time RT-PCR in the early diagnosis of influenza virus infections will significantly contribute to the management of the patient's treatment. Thus, unnecessary drug use will be prevented and controlled with effective treatment of the disease at the time of ...
Source: Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni - Category: Microbiology Tags: Mikrobiyol Bul Source Type: research
Last year was a lousy year for the flu vaccine. Hospitalizations for flu hit a nine-year high, and the vaccine prevented flu in only 23% of all recipients, compared with 50% to 60% of recipients in prior years. Why does the flu vaccine work well in some winters and not others? The flu vaccine primes the immune system to attack two proteins on the surface of the influenza A virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). Different flu strains have different combinations of these proteins — for example, the strains targeted by recent flu vaccines are H3N2 and H1N1. Unfortunately, the influenza virus is microbiology&rsq...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cold and Flu Vaccines Flu Shot flu vaccine Source Type: news
Overtesting — it’s an epidemic threatening consumers of U.S. health care. The notion that testing can be anything but beneficial belies the common assumption that more information is always better, as exemplified by billionaire Mark Cuban’s proclamation earlier this year that he obtains “baseline” quarterly blood tests and encourages others to do so. Knowledge is power, right? Not always. Aside from adding economic strain to our already beleaguered health care system, overtesting can harm patients from the adverse effects of the test itself or as a result of the interventions that ensue. In an...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Cancer Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
More News: Bacterial Pneumonia | Children | Emergency Medicine | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Infectious Diseases | Meningitis Vaccine | Pediatrics | Pneomococcal Vaccine | Pneumonia | Study | Vaccines