Advances in Perfusion Systems for Solid Organ Preservation.

Advances in Perfusion Systems for Solid Organ Preservation. Yale J Biol Med. 2018 Sep;91(3):301-312 Authors: Salehi S, Tran K, Grayson WL Abstract In the past, a diagnosis of organ failure would essentially be a death sentence for patients. With improved techniques for organ procurement and surgical procedures, transplantations to treat organ failure have become standard medical practice. However, while the demand for organs has skyrocketed, the donor pool has not kept pace leading to long recipient waiting lists. Organ preservation provides a means to increase the number of available transplantable organs. However, there are significant drawbacks associated with cold storage, the current gold standard. To address the short-comings due to diffusional limitations, engineers have developed cold perfusion systems. More recently, there has been a significant trend towards the development of near-normothermic systems to enhance the functional preservation of solid organs including livers, lungs, hearts, kidneys, and vascularized composite allotransplants. Here we review recent advances in the development of perfusion systems for the preservation of solid organs. We provide a brief history of organ transplantation, the limitations of existing systems, and describe research being done to develop commercially available perfusion systems to enhance organ preservation. PMID: 30258317 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale J Biol Med Source Type: research

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Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate the effects of various perfusion temperatures on lung graft preservation during ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP).
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 583 Source Type: research
Human body is intertwined collection of lives of Individual organs.We believe death occurs when brain dies , respiration stops and circulation ceases . Curiously ,when life ends , these organs  don’t die as a single unit . These three events can happen in any of the six possible permutations.Each organ takes different times to die after loss of life.It is like a crashed computer , where the mother board /RAM memory may be transferred to another and be functional . Out of these three , heart function appears to be supreme as it can function without the need of brain (Science of brain-death) and keep the body...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Heart transplantation donor heart transport transmedics Source Type: blogs
Abstract Donors after brain death (DBD) have been the major source of organ donation due to good perfusion of the organs. However, owing to the mismatch in demand and supply of the organ donors and recipients, donors after circulatory death (DCDDs) has increased recently all over the world. Kidneys, liver, and lungs are being used for transplantation from DCDDs. Recently, heart transplantation from DCDDs has been started, which is under the firestorm of scrutiny by the ethicists. The ethical dilemma revolves around the question whether the donors are actually dead when they are declared dead by cardiocirculatory d...
Source: Indian Heart J - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Indian Heart J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Indian Heart JournalAuthor(s): Shayan Marsia, Ariba Khan, Maryam Khan, Saba Ahmed, Javeria Hayat, Abdul Mannan Khan Minhas, Samir Mirza, Nisar Asmi, Jonathon ConstantinAbstractDonors after brain dead (DBD) have been the major source of organ donation due to good perfusion of the organs. However, due to the mismatch in demand and supply of the organ donors and recipients, organ donation after circulatory death has increased recently all over the world. Kidneys, liver and lungs are being used for transplantation from Donors after circulatory death (DCDDs). Recently, he...
Source: Indian Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we have shown that the lipid chaperones FABP4/FABP5 are critical intermediate factors in the deterioration of metabolic systems during aging. Consistent with their roles in chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in young prediabetic mice, we found that FABPs promote the deterioration of glucose homeostasis; metabolic tissue pathologies, particularly in white and brown adipose tissue and liver; and local and systemic inflammation associated with aging. A systematic approach, including lipidomics and pathway-focused transcript analysis, revealed that calorie restriction (CR) and Fabp4/5 deficiency result ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Hypothermic oxygenated machine perfusion has been shown to be beneficial in clinical kidney and liver transplantation, but has not yet been used routinely in clinical heart transplantation. We studied the effect of this technique on the quality of porcine donor hearts at the cellular level following extended preservation times (12 hours).
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: The combined EVOP-MSCs is a therapeutic technique that should be soon applied in the practice of solid organ transplants. However, certain remarks should be considered on the pre-clinical levels before taking the studies further into the clinical levels. Although the present report will focus on the lung transplant, the ideas and the remarks are also to be considered for all other solid organ transplants, such as heart, liver and kidney. PMID: 28296873 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Stem Cells - Category: Stem Cells Tags: J Stem Cells Source Type: research
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