Caffeine Linked to Lower Mortality in CKD Caffeine Linked to Lower Mortality in CKD

A large observational study finds a significant inverse relationship between consuming caffeine and all-cause mortality among US patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 19 April 2019Source: Canadian Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Pierluigi Costanzo, Vladimír D┼żavíkAbstractPatients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), while patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis represent a population at particularly high risk of developing cardiac ischemic events. Patients with CKD and acute coronary syndromes (ACS) should be treated the same way as ACS patients without kidney dysfunction. The benefit of revascularization in patients with advanced kidney failure and CA...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
ConclusionBiomarkers from urine samples yield more significant outcome as compare to biomarkers from blood samples. But, validation and confirmation with a different type of study designed on a larger population is needed. More comparison studies on different types of samples are needed to further illuminate which biomarker is the better tool for the diagnosis and prognosis of CKD.
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The addition of AST-120 to conventional treatments may delay the progression of renal dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy. The antioxidant effect of AST-120 might contribute to improvement in renal function. PMID: 31001934 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 73, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 73, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 73, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 73, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 73, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
ConclusionsGPBB has a limited role as a biomarker in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. BNP concentrations were elevated in pre-eclampsia compared to controls. This suggests cardiac strain at the time of pre-eclampsia. Further studies are needed to examine whether BNP can identify women at increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Authors: Uehara A, Kita Y, Sumi H, Shibagaki Y Abstract Hypomagnesemia, a side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), can be asymptomatic. The presence of hypocalcemia or hypokalemia is indicative of hypomagnesemia; however, the concomitant use of PPIs and thiazide may mask hypocalcemia. A 79-year-old woman with a history of chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease developed symptomatic hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. Five weeks earlier, she had developed thiazide-induced hyponatremia, so thiazide had been discontinued. Reviewing the patient's charts revealed that three discontinued thiazide administrati...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
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