Contact Lenses May Harbor Serious, Blinding Infection

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 -- Contact lens wearers everywhere need to be on the lookout for a rare, but potentially blinding, eye infection, British researchers warn. In southeast England, cases of the infection, called Acanthamoeba keratitis, have...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: This case shows resolution of recalcitrant Acanthamoeba keratitis with oral miltefosine in an immunocompetent patient. Further clinical evidence would be needed to possibly incorporate this medication in the antiamoebic armamentarium.
Source: Cornea - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Species of Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens which can cause sight threatening Acanthamoeba keratitis and a rare but deadly brain infection, granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Due to conversion of Acanthamo...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
PMID: 31095535 [PubMed - in process]
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Conclusions: Consensus among stakeholders about water and CL care is needed. Guidelines should unequivocally advocate for the avoidance of any water exposure including handling CLs with wet hands, rinsing CLs or storage cases in tap water, showering while wearing CLs and swimming with CLs without wearing goggles.
Source: Cornea - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionEven in advanced cases with ring infiltrate, eradication of infection with anti-amoebic drugs is possible. In those requiring keratoplasty, the surgical timing should be made meticulously considering graft size and signs of dilated pupil/iris atrophy in terms of post-operative glaucoma.
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Even in advanced cases with ring infiltrate, eradication of infection with anti-amoebic drugs is possible. In those requiring keratoplasty, the surgical timing should be made meticulously considering graft size and signs of dilated pupil/iris atrophy in terms of post-operative glaucoma. PMID: 31076316 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: J Formos Med Assoc - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Formos Med Assoc Source Type: research
Acanthamoeba Keratitis (AK) is a relatively uncommon but sight-threatening infection of the cornea [1]. Historically, the strongest risk factor for AK has been contact lens (CL) wear though AK can still occur in non-CL wearers.
Source: Contact Lens and Anterior Eye - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype may cause fatal brain infection known as granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, and vision-threatening eye infection Acanthamoeba keratitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiamoebic effects of three clinically available antidiabetic drugs Glimepiride, Vildagliptin and Repaglinide against A. castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. Furthermore, these drugs were attempted to conjugate with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to enhance antiamoebic effects. Amoebicidal, encystation, excystation, and host cells cytotoxicity assays were performed to unr...
Source: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT Traci Lawson, 50, from Lansing, Michigan, was diagnosed with Acanthamoeba keratitis, a parasitic infection from poor contact lens hygeine.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions: Reduction in Acanthamoeba cyst density with treatment can be monitored by IVCM, which in turn can be used clinically in prognostication and disease monitoring of AK.
Source: Cornea - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Clinical Science Source Type: research
More News: Acanthamoeba Keratitis | Free Living Amoebozoa Infection | General Medicine | UK Health