Scientists Are Developing New Ways to Treat Disease With Cells, Not Drugs

When Nichelle Obar learned she was pregnant with her second child last year, she never expected that her pregnancy, or her baby, would make history. But when the 40-year-old food-and-beverage coordinator from Hawaii and her fiancé Christopher Constantino went to their 18-week ultrasound, they learned something was wrong. The heart was larger than it should have been, and there was evidence that fluid was starting to build up around the organ as well. Both were signs that the fetus was working extra hard to pump blood to its fast-growing body and that its heart was starting to fail. Obar’s doctor knew what could be causing it. Obar and Constantino are both carriers of a genetic blood disorder called alpha thalassemia, which can lead to dangerously low levels of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and transports it from the lungs to feed other cells–so fewer red blood cells means low levels of oxygen in cells throughout the body. Neither parent is affected by the condition, but depending on how their genes combined, their children could be. When Obar was pregnant with their first child, Gabriel, the couple was told that if he had the disease, his prognosis would be grim. “The information we got was that most babies don’t survive, and if they do survive to birth, they might not live for too long,” Obar says. Gabriel was lucky. The DNA he inherited from his mom and dad did not endow his cells with enough o...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

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Source: Current Psychiatry Reviews - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
Source: Current Psychiatry Reviews - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2018Source: Seminars in Cell &Developmental BiologyAuthor(s): Talita Glaser, Vanessa Fernandes Arnaud Sampaio, Claudiana Lameu, Henning UlrichAbstractCalcium is the ubiquitous second messenger used by any living cell. The fine-tuning of intracellular free calcium concentration [(Ca2+)i] homeostasis and signalling pathways is crucial for the maintenance of the healthy organism. Many alterations in the homeostasis can be compensated by robust mechanisms; however, cells that already present some debility in those mechanisms, or that are over stimulated cannot compensate the s...
Source: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study proposed alternate IVF adjustment factors that will produce more accurate screening results within the population of Ontario. PMID: 30539731 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
Authors: Matanes E, Abitbol J, Kessous R, Kogan L, Octeau D, Lau S, Salvador S, Gotlieb WH Abstract OBJECTIVE: In view of the recent controversy concerning the use of minimally invasive radical hysterectomy as primary treatment for early stage cervical cancer, this study compared the survival and perioperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent radical hysterectomy either by laparotomy or by robotics. METHODS: This retrospective study compared all consecutive patients with early stage cervical cancer since the beginning of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the Jewish General Hospital in 2003, ...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Since the government of Ontario began funding IVF and ICSI cycles, more patients are accessing treatment, many for the first time. The clinical pregnancy rate was maintained, whereas multiple gestations were significantly reduced. These findings support the benefit of single embryo transfer in the context of funded IVF and ICSI and demonstrate the importance of government-funded assisted reproductive technology. PMID: 30528839 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: A literature search found 22 cases through PubMed and Ovid, with key words "amyotrophic lateral sclerosis" and "pregnancy." Both slow progression and rapid progression of ALS during pregnancy have been reported. Worsening of symptoms seems to be common, but little is still known about the influence of pregnancy on ALS onset and progression. PMID: 30528837 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Observational studies suggest some degree of association between serum hormones measured in pregnancy and a woman's future risk of breast and ovarian cancer. More data are needed to determine sufficiently whether certain blood hormone levels measured in pregnancy are predictive of future cancer risk. PMID: 30528445 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
Authors: Ladhani NNN, Fockler ME, Stephens L, Barrett JFR, Heazell AEP Abstract OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this consensus statement is to develop consensus statements to guide clinical practice and recommendations for antenatal care, intrapartum care, and the psychosocial considerations necessary in the care of pregnant women with a history of stillbirth. INTENDED USERS: Clinicians involved in the obstetric management of women with a history of stillbirth or other causes of perinatal loss TARGET POPULATION: Women and families presenting for care following a pregnancy affected by stillbirth or other cau...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
Authors: Boucoiran I, Castillo E Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology, natural history, evaluation, and prevention of rubella infection during pregnancy. This will aid obstetric care providers in counseling their patients regarding potentially devastating effects on the developing fetus and the importance of vaccinating susceptible women as appropriate. OUTCOMES: Outcomes evaluated include fetal rubella infection, maternal seroconversion and response to rubella-containing vaccines. EVIDENCE: Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched for articles in English on subjects related t...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
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