Glass of milk, a cup of yogurt and a pad of butter could lower your risk of heart disease

A new study from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, has found that eating three servings of dairy a day makes you two times less likely to suffer a stroke or from heart disease.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionsThe multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the D allele in the promoter region of the VEGF gene is an independent risk factor of DR irrespective of other laboratory and clinical variables in T2DM patients. Our study suggests that I/D allele in the studied gene is associated with HF and strokes.
Source: Advances in Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research
There is a mountain of high-quality research supporting a Mediterranean-style diet as the best diet for our cardiovascular health. But what does this diet actually look like, why does it work, and how can we adopt it into our real lives? What is a Mediterranean diet? The Mediterranean diet is not a fad. It is a centuries-old approach to meals, traditional to the countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea. The bulk of the diet consists of colorful fruits and vegetables, plus whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, fish and seafood, with olive oil and perhaps a glass of red wine. There is no butter, no refined grains (like ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: The burden of disease was higher in the population with disabilities than that in the general population. Cardiovascular diseases and cancer had a higher burden of disease than did other diseases in the population with disabilities; thus, overall, non-communicable diseases have a higher burden of disease than communicable diseases or injuries in the population with disabilities than in the general population. PMID: 30636948 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Here’s another reason why getting a good night’s sleep should be on your must-do list: Sleeping fewer than six hours a night or waking frequently raises your risk of developing damaging plaque in arteries throughout your body, not just your heart. Previous research has shown poor sleep to be strongly associated with coronary heart disease, but “This is the first study to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body,” José Ordovás, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA H...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Heart Disease Sleep Tufts University Source Type: news
Authors: Purnamasari D Abstract Based on data from the Indonesian Ministry of Health Information Center, the estimated population of Indonesia in 2016 was approximately 258,704,986 people, consisted of 129,988,690 men and 128,716,296 women. This number of Indonesian population represents young population since the proportion of population aged 0-14 years is more than that aged>14 years. Meanwhile, the proportion of population aged 50 years and above is significantly reduced, which is thought to be due to high mortality rate in the middle-aged population. The mortality rate in  Indonesia is dominated by non-...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
A previously healthy, well-appearing 42-year-old female living in a modern, high-rise apartment in downtown Los Angeles calls 9-1-1 at 5:30 am complaining of worsening of a burning, epigastric pain she had been experiencing for the last three days. She reports associated nausea and non-bloody, non-bilious vomiting, and that she couldn’t manage to get comfortable in bed until she finally decided to call for help at daybreak. During her 9-1-1 call, she reports “pain, like heartburn, that just woke me up again and I had to throw up, … and then I was sweating so much.” Using the Los Angeles Tiered Disp...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news
ConclusionsThis systematic review supports existing recommendations for fruit and vegetable intakes. Current comparative risk assessments might significantly underestimate the protective associations of fruit and vegetable intakes.
Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Authors: Chrysant SG, Chrysant GS Abstract Overweight and obesity in children and adults have significantly risen in the US and worldwide due to biological, environmental, and cultural drivers and account for about 2.1 billion people. In addition, obesity, even metabolically healthy, is a major risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, all significant causes of cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD) heart failure (HF) and stroke. However, despite these causative effects, overweight and obesity frequently, confer a protection in patients with estab...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
(CNN) — People who eat diets that are high in fiber have lower risk of death and chronic diseases such as stroke or cancer compared with people with low fiber intake, a new analysis found. Dietary fiber includes plant-based carbohydrates such as whole-grain cereal, seeds and some legumes. Fiber’s health benefits have been recorded “by over 100 years of research,” Andrew Reynolds, a researcher at the University of Otago in New Zealand, wrote in an email. He is co-author of the new meta-analysis of existing research, which was published Thursday in the journal The Lancet. The research shows that high...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN fiber Local TV Source Type: news
People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have less stress, healthier blood vessels and a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes.Residential greenness is associated with lower levels of sympathetic activation, reduced oxidative stress, and higher angiogenic capacity. This is independent of age, sex, race, smoking status, neighborhood deprivation, statin use, and roadway exposure.For this study (see the link below), researchers tested for a variety of biomarkers of stress and heart disease risk in blood and urine samples from 408 patients at a cardiology clinic in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.Residents of th...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Longevity Nature Source Type: blogs
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