Pandemics in History

Smallpox Paris – 1719 Sweden – 1749-1765 The post Pandemics in History appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog.
Source: Inside Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Historians of public health estimate that throughout human history malaria, tuberculosis, and smallpox have killed more people than the plague. But discussion of plague often evokes a deep visceral fear, since plague has taken the lives of hundreds of millions over the centuries, usually in dramatic and socially disruptive pandemics linked to international trade.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Stamp vignette on medical science Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The first of the three hypotheses about its origins is the Columbian hypothesis, which states that Columbus's crew acquired syphilis from Native Americans and carried it back to Europe in 1493 A. D. On the contrary, the second hypothesis (pre-Columbian) asserts that syphilis was present in Europe long before Columbus's voyage and was transferred to the New World by Columbus's men. The Unitarian theory argues that syphilis, bejel, yaws, and pinta are not separate diseases but they represent syndromes caused by slightly different strains of one organism. Nowadays, Syphilis' origin is still uncertain and remains ...
Source: Endocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders Drug Targets - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research
Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Human challenge studies and systems biology approaches are important tools that should be used in concert to advance our understanding of influenza infection and provide targets for novel therapeutics and immunizations. Introduction Although influenza virus was recognized as an important pathogen over a century ago, influenza continues to cause a significant burden of disease. In the United States alone, it's estimated that in the 2017–2018 season there were 959,000 hospitalizations related to influenza illness, and 79,400 deaths (CDC, 2018). Worldwide, WHO estimates that annual influenza...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Here, we reflect on the 1918 influenza pandemic, including its emergence and subsequent rapid global spread. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology associated with the 1918 virus and its predilection for the young and healthy, the rise of influenza therapeutic research following the pandemic, and, finally, our level of preparedness for future pandemics. PMID: 30727970 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical History - Category: History of Medicine Authors: Tags: BMC Infect Dis Source Type: research
This report highlights the recent accomplishments of GVN researchers in several important areas of medical virology, including strategies for the eradication of smallpox, measles, polio, SARS and vector-borne or zoonotic infections, emergence and intervention strategies for retroviruses and arboviruses, preparedness for outbreaks of Filo- and other hemophilic viruses, pathogenesis, impact and prevention of respiratory viruses, as well as, viruses affecting the central and peripheral nervous system. Also threats in crisis settings like refugee camps were presented.
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
This report highlights the recent accomplishments of GVN researchers in several important areas of medical virology, including strategies for the eradication of smallpox, measles, polio, SARS and vector-borne or zoonotic infections, emergence and intervention strategies for retroviruses and arboviruses, preparedness for outbreaks of Filo- and other hemophilic viruses, pathogenesis, impact and prevention of respiratory viruses, as well as, viruses affecting the central and peripheral nervous system. Also threats in crisis settings like refugee camps were presented. PMID: 30690044 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
In the first episode for 2019, the TWiV team reviews the amazing virology stories of the past year. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Please take the TWiV listener survey ASV 2019 Satellite Symposia Crowdfunding for EV-D68 research TWiV World Tour 2018 t-shirt (Amazon) Cool virology from 2018 Viruses behind AD? TWiV 505, TWiV 519, clinical trial one and two Wolbachia-mosquito release halts dengue (TWiV 506); World Mosq...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Up until the first half of the twentieth century, large-scale health disasters were mostly due to natural causes (earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, etc.) or infections (e.g., smallpox, influenza epidemics, cholera). But something peculiar happened as we entered the second half of the century: Health disasters due to natural causes became dwarfed by large-scale health disasters that are man-made. Here’s a list of the Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years, mostly man-made phenomena that have exacted huge tolls: widespread disease, premature death, poorly managed (though nonetheless highly profitable fo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe distinctive array of socioeconomic, biologic, and epidemiologic factors that characterize STDs like syphilis also apply to AIDS and weaken the assumption that the AIDS epidemic can be ended by implementing today's UNAIDS plan. The discourse of ending the AIDS epidemic may be a carryover from the successful elimination, before the appearance of AIDS, of smallpox—a disease that is not comparable to AIDS owing to different biologic qualities, social concerns, epidemiologic behaviors, and the possession of an effective vaccine. Future AIDS control campaigns should therefore concentrate on maximizing ART di...
Source: The Milbank Quarterly - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Original Investigation Source Type: research
More News: Blogging | Pandemics | Smallpox | Surgeons