Opioid Maker to Pay for Overdose-Antidote Development

A company whose prescription opioid marketing practices are being blamed for sparking the addiction and overdose crisis says it's helping to fund an effort to make a lower-cost overdose antidote. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma announced Wednesday that it's making a $3.4 million grant to Harm Reduction Therapeutics, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit, to help develop a low-cost naloxone nasal spray. The announcement comes as lawsuits from local governments blaming Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, and other companies in the drug industry for using deceptive marketing practices to encourage heavy prescribing of the powerful and addictive painkillers. Last week, the number of lawsuits against the industry being overseen by a federal judge topped 1,000. The Cleveland-based judge, Dan Polster, is pushing the industry to settle with the plaintiffs — mostly local governments and Native American tribes — and with state governments, most of which have sued in state court or are conducting a joint investigation. Hundreds of other local governments are also suing in state courts across the country. The sides have had regular settlement discussions, but it's not clear when a deal might be struck in the case, which is complicated by the number of parties and questions on how to assign blame. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that drug overdoses killed a record 72,000 Americans last year, about 10 percent more than in 2016. The majority of the deaths ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) on Thursday announced an ambitious new study that’s meant to reduce opioid-related deaths by 40% in communities that have been hardest-hit by the ongoing epidemic. The NIH awarded grants to four research sites — the University of Kentucky, Boston Medical Center, Columbia University and Ohio State University — through the three-year, $350 million project, called the HEALing Communities Study. Each site will test the effectiveness of various strategies for combating and preventing opioid addiction in at least 15 communities in those states that are struggling with wid...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Research Source Type: news
What is Clonidine? Originally developed as a nasal decongestant, Clonidine has been found to work very well for patients experiencing withdrawal symptoms from opiates. According to the JamaNetwork, Clonidine produces a rapid and statistically significant decrease in opiate withdrawal signs and symptoms. Clonidine administration for 14 days enabled all patients to be successfully detoxified from chronic opiate administration. In all patients studied, clonidine was a safe and effective non-opiate treatment of opiate withdrawal that suppressed the effect, signs, and symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Withdrawal Symptoms When some...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Anxiety Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Substance Abuse drug detox medicated-assisted detox opiate abuse opiate addiction opioid opioids prescriptio Source Type: blogs
BACKGROUND: In Canada, the rise in prescription opioid (PO) overdoses and addiction is a major public health concern. Various health authorities have recently recommended that physicians use caution when prescribing opioids, especially to people with histo...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Conclusions The treatment used for PD, particularly DA, is associated with the development of ICDs and related behaviors. Susceptibility to these disorders depends on the associated risk factors. ICDs can have serious personal, family, psychosocial, financial, and medical consequences. However, in contrast, artistic activities have been described in patients with PD while undergoing treatment with DA. These patients are compulsive but report a positive influence on quality of life. These findings highlight the need for a very critical approach at the moment of Dopaminergic Replacement therapy choice. Author Contributio...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
With the opioid epidemic now claimingnearly 2000 lives from overdose in the United States each month, the medical profession is increasingly accepting the assessment of noted surgeon and writer Atul Gawande, MD:“We started it.” Specialty societies such as theAmerican Academy of Family Physicians andAmerican College of Physicians are offering tools to reduce the unnecessary use of opioids for pain and the risk of addiction. The Federation of State Medical Boards has releasedguidelines for the treatment of chronic pain, and many state medical boards have adopted their own policies. Physicians are responding. Sinc...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
In the most recent 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH)1 more than 1.3 million adolescents ages 12-17 reported past year nonmedical use of prescription drugs. About 70% started using in the past year and about half report nonmedical use of prescription opioid medications. Misuse of prescription opioid medication is associated with 19 times greater risk of transitioning to heroin compared to no misuse.2 Although the national opioid crisis affects all age groups, the steepest rise in unintentional opioid overdose fatalities has been in young adults ages 18-25.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Abstract Post-release opioid-related overdose mortality is the leading cause of death among people released from jails or prisons (PRJP). Informed by the proximate determinants framework, this paper presents the Post-Release Opioid-Related Overdose Risk Model. It explores the underlying, intermediate, proximate and biological determinants which contribute to risk of post-release opioid-related overdose mortality. PRJP share the underlying exposure of incarceration and the increased prevalence of several moderators (chronic pain, HIV infection, trauma, race, and suicidality) of the risk of opioid-related overdose. ...
Source: Addiction Science and Clinical Practice - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Sci Clin Pract Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 April 2019Source: Chemico-Biological InteractionsAuthor(s): Xiabin Chen, Jing Deng, Xirong Zheng, Jinling Zhang, Ziyuan Zhou, Huimei Wei, Chang-Guo Zhan, Fang ZhengAbstractHuman butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is known as a safe and effective protein for detoxification of organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. Its rationally designed mutants with considerably improved catalytic activity against cocaine, known as cocaine hydrolases (CocHs), are recognized as the most promising drug candidates for the treatment of cocaine abuse. However, it is a grand challenge to efficiently produce active re...
Source: Chemico Biological Interactions - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Kratom, an over-the-counter substance often marketed as a health supplement for pain relief, was found to be a cause of at least 91 overdose deaths in the U.S. between 2016 and 2017, according to a Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report published Friday. The figure is more than double a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimate of 44 known deaths associated with kratom since 2011. The CDC’s study examined more than 27,000 overdoses in 27 states from July 2016 and December 2017. In seven of the 91 cases in which kratom was determined to be a cause of death, the drug was the only substance to test pos...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight Research Source Type: news
Abstract Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is known as a safe and effective protein for detoxification of organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. Its rationally designed mutants with considerably improved catalytic activity against cocaine, known as cocaine hydrolases (CocHs), are recognized as the most promising drug candidates for the treatment of cocaine abuse. However, it is a grand challenge to efficiently produce active recombinant BChE and CocHs with a sufficiently long biological half-life. In the present study, starting from a promising CocH, known as CocH3 (i.e. A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant of human...
Source: Chemico-Biological Interactions - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Chem Biol Interact Source Type: research
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