Opioid Maker to Pay for Overdose-Antidote Development

A company whose prescription opioid marketing practices are being blamed for sparking the addiction and overdose crisis says it's helping to fund an effort to make a lower-cost overdose antidote. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma announced Wednesday that it's making a $3.4 million grant to Harm Reduction Therapeutics, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit, to help develop a low-cost naloxone nasal spray. The announcement comes as lawsuits from local governments blaming Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, and other companies in the drug industry for using deceptive marketing practices to encourage heavy prescribing of the powerful and addictive painkillers. Last week, the number of lawsuits against the industry being overseen by a federal judge topped 1,000. The Cleveland-based judge, Dan Polster, is pushing the industry to settle with the plaintiffs — mostly local governments and Native American tribes — and with state governments, most of which have sued in state court or are conducting a joint investigation. Hundreds of other local governments are also suing in state courts across the country. The sides have had regular settlement discussions, but it's not clear when a deal might be struck in the case, which is complicated by the number of parties and questions on how to assign blame. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that drug overdoses killed a record 72,000 Americans last year, about 10 percent more than in 2016. The majority of the deaths ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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AbstractAdolescent opioid misuse, addiction, and overdose have emerged as national health crises. Nearly 17% of high school students have misused prescription opioids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reach and acceptability of a widely-used prescription opioid misuse prevention program,This Is (Not) About Drugs © (TINAD), and its preliminary efficacy at improving opioid misuse knowledge, opioid misuse attitudes, self-efficacy to avoid opioid misuse, and intentions to misuse opioids. Participants were 576 7th grade students (Mage = 11.8; 51% boys; 39% Hispanic, 31% White, 20% Black) from a r...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Heroin overdose and addiction remain significant health and economic burdens in the world today costing billions of dollars annually. Moreover, only limited pharmacotherapeutic options are available for treatment of heroin addiction. In our efforts to combat the public health threat posed by heroin addiction, we have developed vaccines against heroin. To expand upon our existing heroin-vaccine arsenal, we synthesized new aryl and alkyl sulfonate ester haptens; namely aryl-mono-sulfonate (HMsAc) and Aryl/alkyl-di-sulfonate (H(Ds)2) as carboxyl-isosteres of heroin then compared them to our model heroin-hapt...
Source: Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Bioorg Med Chem Lett Source Type: research
Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels in many countries across the globe, including the United States, and pain is one of the most common reasons American adults seek healthcare. To address the interrelated public health crises of opioid use disorder and chronic pain, it is vital that clinicians practicing in diverse roles and settings possess the ability and knowledge to effectively manage pain, responsibly prescribe and monitor opioid analgesics, educate patients about harm reduction techniques, and treat opioid use disorder.
Source: Pain Management Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of a standardized screen for suicide and overdose among patients receiving addiction treatment.
Source: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
Ohio is one of the hardest-hit states in the United States when it comes to opioid overdose deaths. Confronted with over 4,000 opioid overdose deaths in 2017, the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services launched the Community Collective Imp...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
F-phenibut (β-(4-Fluorophenyl)-GABA), a potent GABAB receptor agonist, activates an outward-rectifying K+ current and suppresses the generation of action potentials in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. Eur J Pharmacol. 2020 Jul 28;:173437 Authors: Irie T, Yamazaki D, Kikura-Hanajiri R Abstract The GABA analog phenibut (β-Phenyl-GABA) is a GABAB receptor agonist that has been licensed for various uses in Russia. Phenibut is also available as a dietary supplement from online vendors worldwide, and previous studies have indicated that phenibut overdose results in intoxication, withdrawal symptom...
Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
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Source: Addiction Research and Theory - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
FRIDAY, July 24, 2020 -- Doctors should tell patients and caregivers about the overdose antidote naloxone when they prescribe opioid painkillers such as Percocet and OxyContin and medicines to treat opioid addiction, including buprenorphine,...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Jeffrey A. SingerThe COVID-19 pandemic has placed another stumbling block in the way of the Drug Enforcement Administration ’sfutile effort to reduce the country ’s drug overdose rate through quotas on the manufacture of all forms of prescription opioids.The DEA ’s annual quotas have brought production levels more than 50 percent below 2016 levels. But, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the agency increased this year’s quota by 15 percent, to allow drug makers to respond to pandemic‚Äź‚Äčinduced shortages. Intravenous opioids such as fentanyl are va luable tools used to manage patients on ventil...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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