Healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes (and even reverse it)

The rate of type 2 diabetes is increasing around the world. Type 2 diabetes is a major cause of vision loss and blindness, kidney failure requiring dialysis, heart attacks, strokes, amputations, infections and even early death. Over 80% of people with prediabetes (that is, high blood sugars with the high risk for developing full-blown diabetes) don’t know it. Heck, one in four people who have full-blown diabetes don’t know they have it! Research suggests that a healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes from occurring in the first place and even reverse its progress. Can a healthy diet and lifestyle prevent diabetes? The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a large, long-term study, asked the question: we know an unhealthy diet and lifestyle can cause type 2 diabetes, but can adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle prevent it? This answer is yes: the vast majority of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes can be prevented through diet and lifestyle changes, and this has been proven by 20 years of medical research. Researchers from the DPP took people at risk for type 2 diabetes and gave them a 24-week diet and lifestyle intervention, a medication (metformin), or placebo (a fake pill), to see if anything could lower their risk for developing diabetes. The very comprehensive diet and lifestyle intervention had the goal of changing participants’ daily habits, and included: 16 classes teaching basic nutrition and behavioral strategies for weight loss and physical activity; lif...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Food as medicine Healthy Eating Prevention Source Type: blogs

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Are healthy habits worth cultivating? A recent study suggests healthy habits may help people tack on years of life and sidestep serious illnesses, such as diabetes and cancer. After all, if you’re going to gain an extra decade of life on this earth, you want to enjoy it! What did this research focus on? Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at data from more than 73,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) who were followed for 34 years, and more than 38,000 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) who were followed for 28 years. In a previous s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Follow the simple Wheat Belly No Change Rule for fingerstick blood sugars and you maximize your chances of getting rid of type 2 diabetes and accelerating weight loss. By becoming non-diabetic or at least minimizing it, you are freed from the awful health consequences of this disease, as well as extending life considerably. The No Change Rule also helps reverse insulin resistance that blocks weight loss. Transcript: Hi everybody. Doctor William Davis here. I want to talk about something I call the Wheat Belly “No Change Rule” — that is, no change in blood sugar — comparing a pre-meal to ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates diabetes no change rule undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
I don’t mean that you will be struck down by simply stepping into a Dunkin’ Donuts. I mean that donuts and others things wheat and grains will substantially abbreviate y0ur life, or at least make your time on earth a lot more miserable. I’ve been accused of exaggeration to get the no-wheat, no-grain message through. But if you see what I see every day, I think that you would agree: The consumption of wheat and grains is entirely inappropriate for humans; we exchange near-term calories for deterioration of long-term health that takes numerous forms. And when you see lives completely turned around by banish...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune bowel flora diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation joint pain undoctored Source Type: blogs
“Treat the patient, not the number.” This is a very old and sound medical school teaching. However, when it comes to blood sugar control in diabetes, we have tended to treat the number, thinking that a lower number would equal better health. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset diabetes) is associated with all sorts of very bad things: infections, angry nerve endings causing chronic pain, damaged kidneys, vision loss and blindness, blocked arteries causing heart attacks, strokes, and amputations… So of course, it made good sense that the lower the blood sugar, the lower the chances of ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Health Source Type: blogs
ury Hossain Diabetes is associated with obesity, generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress and redox imbalances which are implicated in the progression of micro- and macro-complications like heart disease, stroke, dementia, cancer, kidney failure and blindness. All these complications rise primarily due to consistent high blood glucose levels. Insulin and glucagon help to maintain the homeostasis of glucose and lipids through signaling cascades. Pancreatic hormones stimulate translocation of the glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) from an intracellular location to the cell surface and facilitate th...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
In this study, we asked people in an open-ended way about their desire for longer life: Would you like to have more time? What age would you like to become? This was something more specific than asking about a preference for survival without reference to any length of time; about one's plans for the future; or whether people see the future as open or limited, as in studies of future time perspective. Our attempt was to discover whether there were preferred temporal spans with which older adults framed their futures and plans. The two-question series about extra years and desired age ("How old would you like to ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This report captures the state of the research community in a nutshell: progress in the sense that ever more scientists are willing to make the treatment of aging the explicit goal of their research, but, unfortunately, there is still a long way to go in improving the nature of that research. It is still near entirely made up of projects that cannot possibly produce a robust and large impact on human life span. The only course of action likely to extend life by decades in the near future is implementation of the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies - to repair the molecular damage that causes aging. Everything else on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, DNAm of multiple disease-related genes are strongly linked to mortality outcomes. The recently established epigenetic clock (DNAm age) has received growing attention as an increasing number of studies have uncovered it to be a proxy of biological ageing and thus potentially providing a measure for assessing health and mortality. Intriguingly, we targeted mortality-related DNAm changes and did not find any overlap with previously established CpGs that are used to determine the DNAm age. Our findings are in line with evidence, suggesting that DNAm involved in ageing or health-related outcomes are mostly...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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