Medical News Today: Why do my arms go numb at night?

A feeling of the arms falling asleep can occur at any time of the day or night. If a person experiences this frequently at night, it may be a symptom of an underlying issue, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, vitamin B deficiency, or diabetes. Here, learn more about the causes and prevention of this sensation.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Given the depressive comorbidity impact on the neuropathic pain components as well as the quality of life, screening for this comorbidity should be part of the baseline ND assessment. PMID: 32617124 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Pain Research and Management - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pain Res Manag Source Type: research
Conclusions: Both examinations can be used with confidence in the diagnosis of CTS overlapping with DN, but the EDX examination seems to be more accurate. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the US and EDX parameters. PMID: 32517033 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
DiabetesMine dives into the specifics of living with carpal tunnel syndrome and diabetes.
Source: Diabetes Mine - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: blogs
DiabetesMine dives into the specifics of living with carpal tunnel syndrome and diabetes.
Source: Diabetes Mine - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Although the majority of diabetic patients were asymptomatic for the UNE, approximately one third of all patients with DM were found to have UNE. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is closely related with PNP.
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology - Category: Neurology Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Source: Journal of Hand Therapy - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Source Type: research
We’ve all been there. You awaken in the morning and one of your hands is completely numb. It feels dead, heavy, and simply won’t work. Perhaps there’s some tingling as well. Or, you arise from a long dinner or movie and one of your legs feels that way. Then over a few minutes — maybe you shook your hands, stamped your foot — everything goes back to normal. Until the next time. The first time this happened, it might have been worrisome. Now that you know it’s temporary and happens to everyone, it may not bother you. But did you ever wonder why in the world this happens? Read on! When the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Aging Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs
Authors: Fournier E Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is too common a condition not to daily interact with the practitioner, if only because of its entanglement to other pathologies, causal or chance association. The typical symptomatology, with hand paresthesia and morning pain upon waking, is related to a median nerve injury in the confined space of the carpal tunnel, more often by local inflammation and tenosynovitis of the finger flexors (repetitive activity of the hands). SCC may be secondary to situations (pregnancy) or conditions (edema, hypothyroidism…), which exaggerate the ordinary pathophysiol...
Source: Revue de Medecine Interne - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Rev Med Interne Source Type: research
Authors: Gudin J, Nalamachu S Abstract Interest in and use of topical analgesics has been increasing, presumably due to their potential utility for relief of acute and chronic pain. Topically applied agents with analgesic properties can target peripheral nociceptive pathways while minimizing absorption into the plasma that leads to potential systemic adverse effects.Clinical trials have found 5% lidocaine patches to be effective and well tolerated for the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) with a minimal risk of toxicity or drug-drug interactions. With this patch formulation, the penetration of lidocaine in...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
AbstractAmyloid transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis with polyneuropathy (PN) is a progressive, debilitating, systemic disease wherein transthyretin protein misfolds to form amyloid, which is deposited in the endoneurium. ATTR amyloidosis with PN is the most serious hereditary polyneuropathy of adult onset. It arises from a hereditary mutation in theTTR gene and may involve the heart as well as other organs. It is critical to identify and diagnose the disease earlier because treatments are available to help slow the progression of neuropathy. Early diagnosis is complicated, however, because presentation may vary and family his...
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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